What the Fork: Implementation Aspects of a Forkcipher

Antoon Purnal, Elena Andreeva, Arnab Roy, Damian Vizar

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Abstract

Lightweight cryptography refers to cryptographic designs that are heavily optimized to minimize resources, such as computational complexity, latency, energy/power consumption, hardware area, code size, and RAM, or to be very efficient in a particular application scenario, where the “conventional” cryptography would not suffice. Prompted by the growing demand for such designs, NIST launched the Lightweight Cryptography project which is supposed to identify and possibly standardize suitable lightweight authenticated encryption (AE) and hashing algorithms in a well established open competition framework. One of these submissions is ForkAE. ForkAE proposes a new primitive ForkSkinny and AE modes optimized for applications where very short messages dominate the communication. In this paper, we investigate multiple implementation/trade-off strategies for ForkAE, benchmark the synthesized hardware and compare it with several other lightweight AE primitives, and give performance and area estimates for the implementation of the ForkAE modes, as well as some selected competitors.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationNIST Lightweight Cryptography Workshop 2019
Number of pages12
Publication date2019
Publication statusPublished - 2019
EventNIST Lightweight Cryptography Workshop 2019 - Gaithersburg, United States
Duration: 4 Nov 20196 Nov 2019

Workshop

WorkshopNIST Lightweight Cryptography Workshop 2019
CountryUnited States
CityGaithersburg
Period04/11/201906/11/2019

Bibliographical note

Authors: Antoon Purnal and Elena Andreeva and Arnab Roy and Damian Vizar<br/>Abstract: Lightweight cryptography refers to cryptographic designs that are heavily optimized<br/>to minimize resources, such as computational complexity, latency, energy/power<br/>consumption, hardware area, code size, and RAM, or to be very efficient in a particular<br/>application scenario, where the conventional cryptography would not suffice. Prompted by<br/>the growing demand for such designs, NIST launched the Lightweight Cryptography project<br/>which is supposed to identify and possibly standardize suitable lightweight authenticated<br/>encryption (AE) and hashing algorithms in a well established open competition framework.<br/>One of these submissions is ForkAE. ForkAE proposes a new primitive ForkSkinny and AE<br/>modes optimized for applications where very short messages dominate the communication. In<br/>this paper, we investigate multiple implementation/trade-o strategies for ForkAE, benchmark<br/>the synthesized hardware and compare it with several other lightweight AE primitives,<br/>and give performance and area estimates for the implementation of the ForkAE modes, as<br/>well as some selected competitors.

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