Very high-accuracy calibration of radiation pattern and gain of a near-field probe

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Abstract

In this paper, very high-accuracy calibration of the radiation pattern and gain of a near-field probe is described. An open-ended waveguide near-field probe has been used in a recent measurement of the C-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Antenna Subsystem for the Sentinel 1 mission of the European Space Agency. The measurement has been performed with the planar near-field technique in which the probe uncertainty is directly contributing to the final uncertainty of the SAR instrument. Thus, given the uncertainty requirements for the Sentinel 1 mission, very stringent requirements were set for the probe calibration uncertainty, 0.03 dB (3 sigma) for the directivity within the 3 dB beamwidth and 0.10 dB (3 sigma) for the gain. In order to achieve the requested uncertainty, an extensive investigation was carried out involving a detailed study of all uncertainty sources in the spherical near-field technique used for the probe calibration. The results of the investigation illustrating the significant uncertainty sources and the ways of their compensation to achieve the required probe calibration uncertainty are presented and discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of 8th European Conference on Antennas and Propagation (EuCAP)
PublisherIEEE
Publication date2014
Pages2099-2103
ISBN (Print)9788890701849
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
EventEuCAP 2014: 8th European Conference on Antennas and Propagation - World Forum, The Hague, Netherlands
Duration: 6 Apr 201411 Apr 2014
http://www.eucap2014.org/

Conference

ConferenceEuCAP 2014
LocationWorld Forum
CountryNetherlands
CityThe Hague
Period06/04/201411/04/2014
Internet address

Keywords

  • Near-field probe
  • Reference antenna
  • Antenna measurement
  • Measurement uncertainty

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