Velocity vector estimation in synthetic aperture flow and B-mode imaging

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingArticle in proceedingsResearchpeer-review

212 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

A method for determining both velocity magnitude and angle in a synthetic aperture ultrasound system is described. The approach uses directional beamforming along the flow direction and cross-correlation to determine velocity magnitude. The angle of the flow is determined from the maximum normalized correlation calculated as a function of angle. The method is investigated using data measured by an experimental ultrasound scanner from a flow rig. A commercial 7 MHz linear array transducer is used and data are measured for flow angles of 60° and 90°. The velocity magnitude is determined with a precision of 0.36 % (60°) and 1.2 % (90°), respectively. The 60° angle is estimated with a bias of 0.54° and a standard deviation of 2.1°. For 90° the bias is 0.0003° and standard deviation 1.32°.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationIEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging 2004
PublisherIEEE
Publication date2004
Pages33-36
ISBN (Print)0-7803-8389-3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004
Event4th IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: From Nano to Macro - Arlington, United States
Duration: 15 Apr 200418 Apr 2004
Conference number: 4
http://www.informatik.uni-trier.de/~ley/db/conf/isbi/isbi2004.html

Conference

Conference4th IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging
Number4
CountryUnited States
CityArlington
Period15/04/200418/04/2004
Internet address

Bibliographical note

Copyright: 2004 IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. However, permission to reprint/republish this material for advertising or promotional purposes or for creating new collective works for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or to reuse any copyrighted component of this work in other works must be obtained from the IEEE

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Velocity vector estimation in synthetic aperture flow and B-mode imaging'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this