Using stochastic dynamic modelling to estimate the sensitivity of current and alternative surveillance program of Salmonella in conventional broiler production

Ofosuhene Okofrobour Apenteng*, Mark E. Arnold, Håkan Vigre

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

Since 2018, the EU commission has declared the Danish broiler industry to be Salmonella free. However, there is continuous Salmonella pressure from the environment, and a number of parent flocks and broiler flocks become infected annually. When a parent flock becomes infected, the infection can be transmitted vertically to the broiler flocks, before the parent flock is detected and destroyed, including the eggs at the hatchery. To address this issue, we developed stochastic dynamic modelling of transmission of Salmonella in parent flocks and combined that with the relation between flock prevalence and test sensitivity for environmental samples in the flock. Results suggested that after 10 and 100 infected hens were seeded, the likelihood of detecting an infected parent flock within the three first weeks after the infection was strongly influenced by the taking of five boot swabs (95% CI 70–100) instead of two (95% CI 40–100) or the supplementing of the two boot swabs by a dust sample (95% CI 43–100). Results suggest that the likelihood of detecting the broiler flock as infected in the program was estimated to at least 99% in broiler flock even if only one chicken was initially infected. These findings are of relevance for managing parent flocks and eggs at the hatchery in case of Salmonella infection in parent flocks in the Danish poultry.

Original languageEnglish
Article number19441
JournalScientific Reports
Volume10
Issue number1
ISSN2045-2322
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020

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