Use of waste for heat, electricity and transport—Challenges when performing energy system analysis

Marie Münster, Henrik Lund

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

This paper presents a comparative energy system analysis of different technologies utilising organic waste for heat and power production as well as fuel for transport. Technologies included in the analysis are second-generation biofuel production, gasification, fermentation (biogas production) and improved incineration. It is argued that energy technologies should be assessed together with the energy systems of which they form part and influence. The energy system analysis is performed by use of the EnergyPLAN model, which simulates the Danish energy system hour by hour. The analysis shows that most fossil fuel is saved by gasifying the organic waste and using the syngas for combined heat and power production. On the other hand, least greenhouse gases are emitted if biogas is produced from organic waste and used for combined heat and power production; assuming that the use of organic waste for biogas production facilitates the use of manure for biogas production. The technology which provides the cheapest CO2 reduction is gasification of waste with the subsequent conversion of gas into transport fuel.
Original languageEnglish
JournalEnergy
Volume34
Issue number5
Pages (from-to)636-644
ISSN0360-5442
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009
Externally publishedYes

Cite this

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title = "Use of waste for heat, electricity and transport—Challenges when performing energy system analysis",
abstract = "This paper presents a comparative energy system analysis of different technologies utilising organic waste for heat and power production as well as fuel for transport. Technologies included in the analysis are second-generation biofuel production, gasification, fermentation (biogas production) and improved incineration. It is argued that energy technologies should be assessed together with the energy systems of which they form part and influence. The energy system analysis is performed by use of the EnergyPLAN model, which simulates the Danish energy system hour by hour. The analysis shows that most fossil fuel is saved by gasifying the organic waste and using the syngas for combined heat and power production. On the other hand, least greenhouse gases are emitted if biogas is produced from organic waste and used for combined heat and power production; assuming that the use of organic waste for biogas production facilitates the use of manure for biogas production. The technology which provides the cheapest CO2 reduction is gasification of waste with the subsequent conversion of gas into transport fuel.",
author = "Marie M{\"u}nster and Henrik Lund",
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Use of waste for heat, electricity and transport—Challenges when performing energy system analysis. / Münster, Marie; Lund, Henrik.

In: Energy, Vol. 34, No. 5, 2009, p. 636-644.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Use of waste for heat, electricity and transport—Challenges when performing energy system analysis

AU - Münster, Marie

AU - Lund, Henrik

PY - 2009

Y1 - 2009

N2 - This paper presents a comparative energy system analysis of different technologies utilising organic waste for heat and power production as well as fuel for transport. Technologies included in the analysis are second-generation biofuel production, gasification, fermentation (biogas production) and improved incineration. It is argued that energy technologies should be assessed together with the energy systems of which they form part and influence. The energy system analysis is performed by use of the EnergyPLAN model, which simulates the Danish energy system hour by hour. The analysis shows that most fossil fuel is saved by gasifying the organic waste and using the syngas for combined heat and power production. On the other hand, least greenhouse gases are emitted if biogas is produced from organic waste and used for combined heat and power production; assuming that the use of organic waste for biogas production facilitates the use of manure for biogas production. The technology which provides the cheapest CO2 reduction is gasification of waste with the subsequent conversion of gas into transport fuel.

AB - This paper presents a comparative energy system analysis of different technologies utilising organic waste for heat and power production as well as fuel for transport. Technologies included in the analysis are second-generation biofuel production, gasification, fermentation (biogas production) and improved incineration. It is argued that energy technologies should be assessed together with the energy systems of which they form part and influence. The energy system analysis is performed by use of the EnergyPLAN model, which simulates the Danish energy system hour by hour. The analysis shows that most fossil fuel is saved by gasifying the organic waste and using the syngas for combined heat and power production. On the other hand, least greenhouse gases are emitted if biogas is produced from organic waste and used for combined heat and power production; assuming that the use of organic waste for biogas production facilitates the use of manure for biogas production. The technology which provides the cheapest CO2 reduction is gasification of waste with the subsequent conversion of gas into transport fuel.

U2 - 10.1016/j.energy.2008.09.001

DO - 10.1016/j.energy.2008.09.001

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VL - 34

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