Use of Computer Games to Test Experimental Techniques and Cognitive Models

Jens Rasmussen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingArticle in proceedingsResearch

Abstract

In design of computer systems, one attempts to match the interface to the needs of the users by a careful consideration of the mental representations and information processing strategies which will be effective for the various tasks of the users. In this effort, it is important to consider that the task repertoire will include familiar work routines as well as occasional requirements for problem solving and,in addition, that the system should be able to support a novice without frustrating the highly skilled users.For this purpose an experimental technique is needed which is less time consuming than, for instance, analysis of verbal protocols. The paper discusses the requirements to an experimental setup suited to study mental strategies, their evolution with training, and the related error mechanisms. It is concluded that computer games are well suited for this purpose due to their well structured, closed world and to the amount of data that can be collected from subjects while acquiring a high level of skill.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationEmpirical Foundations of Information and Software Science III. Proceedings
EditorsJ. Rasmussen, P. Zunde
Place of PublicationNew York
PublisherPlenum Publishing Corporation
Publication date1987
Pages187-196
ISBN (Print)0-306-42585-8
Publication statusPublished - 1987
Externally publishedYes
Event3rd Symposium on Empirical Foundations of Information and Software Science - Roskilde, Denmark
Duration: 20 Oct 198523 Oct 1985
Conference number: 3

Conference

Conference3rd Symposium on Empirical Foundations of Information and Software Science
Number3
CountryDenmark
CityRoskilde
Period20/10/198523/10/1985

Cite this

Rasmussen, J. (1987). Use of Computer Games to Test Experimental Techniques and Cognitive Models. In J. Rasmussen, & P. Zunde (Eds.), Empirical Foundations of Information and Software Science III. Proceedings (pp. 187-196). New York: Plenum Publishing Corporation.