Toxicity of tobacco dust to freshwater snails (Planorbella trivolvis) and channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus)

David D. Kuhn, Stephen A. Smith, Mary E. Mainous, Daniel P. Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Tobacco dust is a waste product of the tobacco industry and has been suggested as a molluscicide for aquaculture production. Snails serve as a required intermediate host for a number of trematode parasites. If snails can be eliminated using a molluscicide then aquaculture producers could effectively minimize parasitic infections of trematodes in their fish stocks by breaking the trematode life cycle. Four types of tobacco dust were evaluated as a potential molluscicide including burley (8200. μg/g nicotine), flue-cured (7200. μg/g nicotine), truck burley (4400. μg/g nicotine), and truck flue-cured (3900. μg/g nicotine). Ramshorn snails (Planorbella trivolvis), a common snail found in freshwater aquaculture ponds, were exposed to various concentrations of each type of tobacco dust over a three day period. Test concentrations included of 0. g/L tobacco dust and concentrations of 0.05, 0.25, 0.50, 1.0, and 2.5. g/L tobacco dust. Flue-cured and burley tobacco dust were more toxic compared to truck-flue-cured and truck burley tobacco dust. Tests on channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) were also performed at the same concentrations that were evaluated for snails. A dose between 0.5 to 1.0. g/L tobacco dust was effective in killing 100% of the snails within three days. In other experimental trials, there were no mortalities or histological evidence of effects on catfish at either of the 0.50 and 1.0. g/L tobacco dust concentrations over a 21 day trial. For the ramshorn snails, LC50 (lethal concentration to kill half of the snails) values were estimated to be 8.31, 2.58, and 1.73. mg/L nicotine for 24, 48, and 72. h exposure times, respectively. LC99 (lethal concentration to kill 99% of the snails) values were estimated to be 16.5, 8.35, and 5.41. mg/L nicotine for 24, 48, and 72. h exposure times, respectively. © 2014.
Original languageEnglish
JournalAquacultural Engineering
Volume60
Pages (from-to)14-19
ISSN0144-8609
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Aquatic Science
  • Fish disease
  • Molluscicide
  • Organic pesticide
  • Parasite
  • Animals
  • Aquaculture
  • Curing
  • Dust
  • Fish
  • Flues
  • Molluscs
  • Nicotine
  • Trucks
  • Water
  • Experimental trials
  • Freshwater snails
  • Lethal concentration
  • Organic pesticides
  • Parasitic infections
  • Tobacco
  • aquaculture production
  • concentration (composition)
  • disease incidence
  • dust
  • flatworm
  • freshwater ecosystem
  • histology
  • intermediate host
  • mortality
  • parasite
  • pesticide
  • pond culture
  • snail
  • stock assessment
  • teleost
  • tobacco
  • toxicity
  • Agriculture
  • Environmental issues
  • aquaculture
  • tobacco products
  • tobacco dust toxicity
  • freshwater snail
  • Planorbella trivolvis
  • channel catfish
  • Ictalurus punctatus
  • waste product
  • tobacco industry
  • molluscicide
  • trematode parasite
  • trematode life cycle
  • burley
  • truck burley
  • truck flue-cured
  • ramshorn snail
  • time 24 h
  • time 48 h
  • time 72 h
  • Trematode Infections
  • Ecology: environmental biology - Wildlife management: aquatic
  • Public health: disease vectors - General
  • Pest control: general, pesticides and herbicides
  • Parasitology - General
  • Invertebrata: comparative, experimental morphology, physiology and pathology - Protozoa
  • Invertebrata: comparative, experimental morphology, physiology and pathology - Platyhelminthes
  • Animals, Chordates, Fish, Nonhuman Vertebrates, Vertebrates
  • Animals, Invertebrates, Microorganisms, Protozoans
  • Animals, Helminths, Invertebrates, Platyhelminths

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