Toxicity of silver ions, metallic silver, and silver nanoparticle materials after in vivo dermal and mucosal surface exposure: A review

Niels Hadrup*, Anoop Kumar Sharma, Katrin Löschner

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

Silver is used in different applications that result in contact with skin and mucosal surfaces (e.g., jewelry, wound dressings, or eye drops). Intact skin poses an effective barrier against the absorption of silver. Mucosal surfaces are observed to be less effective barriers and compromised skin is often a poor barrier. Silver can deposit as particles in the human body causing a blue-gray discoloration known as argyria. Urine and feces are reported pathways of excretion. Acute human mortality has been observed following an abortion procedure involving the intrauterine administration of 7 g silver nitrate (64 mg silver/kg body weight). Localized argyria has been reported with exposure to silver ions, metallic surfaces, and nanocrystalline silver. Generalized argyria was observed with ionic and nanocrystalline silver in humans at cumulative doses in the range of 70–1500 mg silver/kg body weight. Silver is observed to have a low potential for skin irritation. Eye irritation and some cases of allergic contact dermatitis have been reported. Silver may cause genotoxicity, but additional data are required to assess its carcinogenic potential. Other reported toxicities include hepatic, renal, neurological, and hematological effects.
Original languageEnglish
JournalRegulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology
Volume98
Pages (from-to)257-267
Number of pages11
ISSN0273-2300
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Keywords

  • Silver
  • Nanoparticle
  • Nanocrystalline
  • Acticoat
  • Silver sulfadine
  • Toxicology
  • Dermal
  • Eye
  • Metallic
  • Genotoxicity

Cite this

@article{355b1250a5fd44a78e6650dd5bbf2d83,
title = "Toxicity of silver ions, metallic silver, and silver nanoparticle materials after in vivo dermal and mucosal surface exposure: A review",
abstract = "Silver is used in different applications that result in contact with skin and mucosal surfaces (e.g., jewelry, wound dressings, or eye drops). Intact skin poses an effective barrier against the absorption of silver. Mucosal surfaces are observed to be less effective barriers and compromised skin is often a poor barrier. Silver can deposit as particles in the human body causing a blue-gray discoloration known as argyria. Urine and feces are reported pathways of excretion. Acute human mortality has been observed following an abortion procedure involving the intrauterine administration of 7 g silver nitrate (64 mg silver/kg body weight). Localized argyria has been reported with exposure to silver ions, metallic surfaces, and nanocrystalline silver. Generalized argyria was observed with ionic and nanocrystalline silver in humans at cumulative doses in the range of 70–1500 mg silver/kg body weight. Silver is observed to have a low potential for skin irritation. Eye irritation and some cases of allergic contact dermatitis have been reported. Silver may cause genotoxicity, but additional data are required to assess its carcinogenic potential. Other reported toxicities include hepatic, renal, neurological, and hematological effects.",
keywords = "Silver, Nanoparticle, Nanocrystalline, Acticoat, Silver sulfadine, Toxicology, Dermal, Eye, Metallic, Genotoxicity",
author = "Niels Hadrup and Sharma, {Anoop Kumar} and Katrin L{\"o}schner",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1016/j.yrtph.2018.08.007",
language = "English",
volume = "98",
pages = "257--267",
journal = "Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology",
issn = "0273-2300",
publisher = "Academic Press",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Toxicity of silver ions, metallic silver, and silver nanoparticle materials after in vivo dermal and mucosal surface exposure: A review

AU - Hadrup, Niels

AU - Sharma, Anoop Kumar

AU - Löschner, Katrin

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Silver is used in different applications that result in contact with skin and mucosal surfaces (e.g., jewelry, wound dressings, or eye drops). Intact skin poses an effective barrier against the absorption of silver. Mucosal surfaces are observed to be less effective barriers and compromised skin is often a poor barrier. Silver can deposit as particles in the human body causing a blue-gray discoloration known as argyria. Urine and feces are reported pathways of excretion. Acute human mortality has been observed following an abortion procedure involving the intrauterine administration of 7 g silver nitrate (64 mg silver/kg body weight). Localized argyria has been reported with exposure to silver ions, metallic surfaces, and nanocrystalline silver. Generalized argyria was observed with ionic and nanocrystalline silver in humans at cumulative doses in the range of 70–1500 mg silver/kg body weight. Silver is observed to have a low potential for skin irritation. Eye irritation and some cases of allergic contact dermatitis have been reported. Silver may cause genotoxicity, but additional data are required to assess its carcinogenic potential. Other reported toxicities include hepatic, renal, neurological, and hematological effects.

AB - Silver is used in different applications that result in contact with skin and mucosal surfaces (e.g., jewelry, wound dressings, or eye drops). Intact skin poses an effective barrier against the absorption of silver. Mucosal surfaces are observed to be less effective barriers and compromised skin is often a poor barrier. Silver can deposit as particles in the human body causing a blue-gray discoloration known as argyria. Urine and feces are reported pathways of excretion. Acute human mortality has been observed following an abortion procedure involving the intrauterine administration of 7 g silver nitrate (64 mg silver/kg body weight). Localized argyria has been reported with exposure to silver ions, metallic surfaces, and nanocrystalline silver. Generalized argyria was observed with ionic and nanocrystalline silver in humans at cumulative doses in the range of 70–1500 mg silver/kg body weight. Silver is observed to have a low potential for skin irritation. Eye irritation and some cases of allergic contact dermatitis have been reported. Silver may cause genotoxicity, but additional data are required to assess its carcinogenic potential. Other reported toxicities include hepatic, renal, neurological, and hematological effects.

KW - Silver

KW - Nanoparticle

KW - Nanocrystalline

KW - Acticoat

KW - Silver sulfadine

KW - Toxicology

KW - Dermal

KW - Eye

KW - Metallic

KW - Genotoxicity

U2 - 10.1016/j.yrtph.2018.08.007

DO - 10.1016/j.yrtph.2018.08.007

M3 - Journal article

VL - 98

SP - 257

EP - 267

JO - Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology

JF - Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology

SN - 0273-2300

ER -