The Use of Soy and Egg Phosphatidylcholines Modified with Caffeic Acid Enhances the Oxidative Stability of High-Fat (70%) Fish Oil-in-Water Emulsions

Betül Yesiltas*, Pedro J. Garcia-Moreno, Ann-Dorit M. Sørensen, Chiranjib Banerjee, Sampson Anankanbil, Zheng Guo, Peter Remsen Ogilby, Charlotte Jacobsen*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

This study investigated the effect of the combined use of sodium caseinate (CAS), commercial phosphatidylcholine (PC), and modified PCs on the physical and oxidative stability of 70% fish oil-in-water emulsions. Caffeic acid was covalently attached to both modified PCs (PCs originated from soy and eggs) in order to increase the antioxidant activity of PCs and investigate the advantage of bringing the antioxidant activity to the close proximity of the oil-water interface. Results showed that oxidative stability was improved when part of the PC was substituted with modified soy PC or egg PC. Emulsions containing a low concentration of modified PCs (10 wt.% of total PC) resulted in a prooxidative effect on the formation of hydroperoxides compared to emulsions with free caffeic acid. On the other hand, a decrease in the formation of volatile oxidation products was observed for emulsions containing higher levels of modified PCs (60 wt.% of total PC) compared to the emulsions with free caffeic acid added at its equivalent concentration. Increased concentrations of modified PCs provided better oxidative stability in high-fat emulsions, independent of the modified PC type. Moreover, when oxidation was initiated by producing singlet oxygen near a single oil droplet using a focused laser, fluorescence imaging showed that the oxidation did not propagate from one oil droplet to another oil droplet.
Original languageEnglish
Article number60
JournalColloids and Interfaces
Volume7
Issue number3
Number of pages14
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2023

Keywords

  • Emulsifiers
  • Surfactants
  • Oxidation
  • Oil-water interface
  • Microscopy

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