The significance of secondary organic aerosol formation and growth in buildings: experimental and computational evidence

G. Sarwar, R. Corsi, D. Allen, Charles J. Weschler

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Experiments were conducted in an 11 m3 environmental chamber to investigate secondaryparticles resulting from homogeneous reactions between ozone and alpha-pinene. Experimental results indicate that rapid fine particle growth occurs due to homogeneous reactions between ozone and alpha-pinene, and subsequent gas-to-particle partitioning of the products. A new indoor air quality model was used to predict dynamic particle mass concentrations based on detailed homogeneous chemical mechanisms and partitioning of semi-volatile products to particles. Chamber particle mass concentrations were estimated from measured particle size distributions and were in reasonable agreement with results predicted from the model. Both experimental and model results indicate that secondary particle mass concentrations incfrease substantially with lower air exchange rates. This is an interesting results, given a continuing trend toward more energy-efficient buildings. Seconary particle mass concentrations are also predictedc to increase with lower indoor temperatures, higher outdoor ozone concentrations, higher outdoor particle concentrations, and higher indoor alpha-pinene emissions rates.
Original languageEnglish
JournalAtmospheric Environment
Volume37
Pages (from-to)1365-1381
ISSN1352-2310
Publication statusPublished - 2003

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