The SE Book: Principles and Techniques of Software Engineering or orAn ABZ of The Theory & Practice of Software Engineering

Dines Bjørner

    Research output: Book/ReportBookpeer-review

    Abstract

    This ``epos'' emphasises (1) software development from both a formal and an informal approach; (2) the use of mathematics, logic and algebras, as well as discrete mathematics: Sets, Cartesians, lists, functions, maps; (3) property as well as model-oriented specifications; (4) semiotics in the form of formalisable syntax and semantics and in-formalisable pragmatics; abstraction and modelling techniques such as (5) hierarchies and compositions; (6) denotations and computations; (7) configurations as contexts and states; (8) time, space and space/time; (9) various modal logics; (10) description theory; (11) the TripTych of domain analysis, requirements engineering and software design -- and much much more. It relates all aspects of (12) platform technologies, (13) legal issues of software, (14) quality assurance, and (15) project and product management to the above (1-11 incl.). Highlights of the book series are: (A) Emphasis on design: Literally a thousand development examples are given; and on ``Calculi'' of (B) domain and (C) requirements engineering: Domain facet ``operators'' like: (d.1) Instrinsics, (d.2) support technology, (d.3) management & organisation, (d.4) rules & regulations, (d.5) human behaviour, and (d.6) domain specific script languages, as well as domain requirements operators such as (c.1) projection, (c.2) determination, (c.3) instantiation, (c.4) extension, (c.5) fitting, and (c.6) initialisation. The concepts of objects and components likewise receive an altogther new and simpler treatment.
    Original languageEnglish
    PublisherIMM (Electronic version)
    Publication statusPublished - 2003

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