The role of gender in social network organization

Ioanna Psylla, Piotr Sapiezynski, Enys Mones, Sune Lehmann Jørgensen

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

The digital traces we leave behind when engaging with the modern world offer an interesting lens through which we study behavioral patterns as expression of gender. Although gender differentiation has been observed in a number of settings, the majority of studies focus on a single data stream in isolation. Here we use a dataset of high resolution data collected using mobile phones, as well as detailed questionnaires, to study gender differences in a large cohort. We consider mobility behavior and individual personality traits among a group of more than 800 university students. We also investigate interactions among them expressed via person-to-person contacts, interactions on online social networks, and telecommunication. Thus, we are able to study the differences between male and female behavior captured through a multitude of channels for a single cohort. We find that while the two genders are similar in a number of aspects, there are robust deviations that include multiple facets of social interactions, suggesting the existence of inherent behavioral differences. Finally, we quantify how aspects of an individual's characteristics and social behavior reveals their gender by posing it as a classification problem. We ask: How well can we distinguish between male and female study participants based on behavior alone? Which behavioral features are most predictive?
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0189873
JournalP L o S One
Volume12
Issue number12
Number of pages21
ISSN1932-6203
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Bibliographical note

Copyright: © 2017 Psylla et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Cite this

Psylla, Ioanna ; Sapiezynski, Piotr ; Mones, Enys ; Jørgensen, Sune Lehmann. / The role of gender in social network organization. In: P L o S One. 2017 ; Vol. 12, No. 12.
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The role of gender in social network organization. / Psylla, Ioanna; Sapiezynski, Piotr; Mones, Enys; Jørgensen, Sune Lehmann.

In: P L o S One, Vol. 12, No. 12, e0189873, 2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Sapiezynski, Piotr

AU - Mones, Enys

AU - Jørgensen, Sune Lehmann

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AB - The digital traces we leave behind when engaging with the modern world offer an interesting lens through which we study behavioral patterns as expression of gender. Although gender differentiation has been observed in a number of settings, the majority of studies focus on a single data stream in isolation. Here we use a dataset of high resolution data collected using mobile phones, as well as detailed questionnaires, to study gender differences in a large cohort. We consider mobility behavior and individual personality traits among a group of more than 800 university students. We also investigate interactions among them expressed via person-to-person contacts, interactions on online social networks, and telecommunication. Thus, we are able to study the differences between male and female behavior captured through a multitude of channels for a single cohort. We find that while the two genders are similar in a number of aspects, there are robust deviations that include multiple facets of social interactions, suggesting the existence of inherent behavioral differences. Finally, we quantify how aspects of an individual's characteristics and social behavior reveals their gender by posing it as a classification problem. We ask: How well can we distinguish between male and female study participants based on behavior alone? Which behavioral features are most predictive?

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