The role of ecological context and predation risk-stimuli in revealing the true picture about the genetic basis of boldness evolution in fish

Thomas Klefoth, Christian Skov, Jens Krause, Robert Arlinghaus

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

To showcase the importance of genotype × environment interactions and the presence of predation risk in the experimental assessment of boldness in fish, we investigated boldness in terms of feeding behavior and refuge use in two genetically different populations of juvenile carp (Cyprinus carpio) in two replicated experimental conditions in ponds and laboratory tanks. The populations were expected to exhibit genetic differences in boldness due to differential evolutionary adaptation to low-predation-risk pond aquaculture conditions. Boldness was measured in variants of open-field trials with and without implementation of additional predation risk-stimuli by angling on feeding spots. Without explicit implementation of risk, genotypes adapted to low-risk environments, i.e., domesticated mirror carp behaved consistently bolder than their less domesticated scaled conspecifics in the pond environment, but not in the laboratory environment. When we implemented artificial risk-stimuli by angling on previously safe feeding spots, boldness differences among genotypes also emerged in the laboratory environment, indicating strong genotype
Original languageEnglish
JournalBehavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
Volume66
Issue number4
Pages (from-to)547-559
ISSN0340-5443
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The role of ecological context and predation risk-stimuli in revealing the true picture about the genetic basis of boldness evolution in fish'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this