The predictable narwhal: satellite tracking shows behavioural similarities between isolated subpopulations

M. P. Heide-Jørgensen, N.H. Nielsen, R. G. Hansen, H. C. Schmidt, S. B. Blackwell, Ole A Jørgensen

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Comparison of behavioural similarities between subpopulations of species that have been isolated for a long time is important for understanding the general ecology of species that are under pressure from large-scale changes in habitats. Narwhals (Monodon monoceros) east and west of Greenland are examples of separated populations that, in different ocean parts, will be coping with similar anthropogenic and climate-driven habitat alterations. To study this, 28 narwhals from the Scoresby Sound fjord system were tracked by satellite in 2010-2013. The average duration of contact with the whales was 124 days with one tag lasting 305 days and one whale recaptured
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Zoology
Volume297
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)54-65
ISSN0952-8369
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Keywords

  • ZOOLOGY
  • MONODON-MONOCEROS
  • ADJACENT WATERS
  • EAST GREENLAND
  • BAFFIN-ISLAND
  • MOVEMENTS
  • WHALES
  • ABUNDANCE
  • CLIMATE
  • AREAS
  • BAY
  • Scoresby Sound
  • whale migration
  • satellite tracking
  • Greenland halibut
  • dive behaviour
  • site fidelity

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