The linkage between car-related fringe benefits and the travel behavior of knowledge workers

Eduard Bendit, Amnon Frenkel, Sigal Kaplan

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingArticle in proceedingsResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    This study focuses on the linkage between car-related fringe benefits and the travel behavior of knowledge workers in commute and leisure trips. Specifically, this study compares the commuting and leisure travel behavior of knowledge workers who receive either a company-car or car allowance with the travel behavior of workers who do not receive car-related fringe benefits. Data are based on a revealed-preferences survey among knowledge workers in Israel. Results show that car-related fringe benefits are associated with (i) high car ownership and car use intensity, (ii) long commute distances and travel times and non-sustainable transport modes, and (iii) high frequency of long-distance leisure trips. Policy implications include (i) directing policies towards reducing car ownership induced by car-related fringe benefits, (ii) encouraging company-car holders to ‘pay their way’, and (iii) encouraging workers to use sustainable transport modes for commuting and leisure travel.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationThe 90th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board
    Publication date2011
    Publication statusPublished - 2011
    EventTransportation Research Board 90th Annual Meeting - Washington DC, United States
    Duration: 23 Jan 201127 Jan 2011
    Conference number: 90

    Conference

    ConferenceTransportation Research Board 90th Annual Meeting
    Number90
    CountryUnited States
    CityWashington DC
    Period23/01/201127/01/2011

    Keywords

    • Company car

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