The influence of fungicides on soil mycoflora with special attention to tests of fungicide effects on soil-borne pathogens

Susanne Elmholt, Jens Christian Frisvad, Ulf Thrane

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingBook chapterResearchpeer-review

Abstract

During the past 20 years a large number of new fungicides have been marketed. These new fungicides have a broad spectrum of activity, and they are particularly attractive to the West European countries that grow high-yielding cultivars of wheat and barley susceptible to a variety of foliar and soil-borne diseases. 1 Denmark belongs to this group of countries, and the introduction of the new fungicides, belonging primarily to the ergosterol biosynthesis inhibitors (EBIs), has made it possible to increase the area with high-value winter annual cereals even though these are more vulnerable to fungal diseases than the summer annuals. In accordance with this, a yearly increase in the fungicide use of 20 to 30% (a.i.) was experienced during the early 1980s (Figure 1). The EBIs are highly active, implying a profound reduction in application rate compared to many older fungicides, so the increase in use of active ingredient reflects an even bigger increase in ‘treatment intensity index’ (TII) (Figure 1). In 1984 the use of fungicides peaked with a TII of 2.3, and this trend was met by an increasing concern of potential hazards to the soil ecosystem and especially to the nontarget soil mycoflora.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPesticide Interactions in Crop Production : Beneficial and Deleterious Effects
EditorsJ. Altman
Number of pages17
Place of PublicationBoca Raton
PublisherTaylor & Francis
Publication date2018
Edition1
Pages227-243
Chapter11
ISBN (Electronic)9781351075459
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Cite this

Elmholt, S., Frisvad, J. C., & Thrane, U. (2018). The influence of fungicides on soil mycoflora with special attention to tests of fungicide effects on soil-borne pathogens. In J. Altman (Ed.), Pesticide Interactions in Crop Production: Beneficial and Deleterious Effects (1 ed., pp. 227-243). Taylor & Francis. https://doi.org/10.1201/9781351075459