The influence of feeding behaviour on growth of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua, Linnaeus, 1758) in the North Sea

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The objective of this study was to resolve key mechanisms driving individual growth patterns of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua). Growth dynamics were analysed by linking growth patterns with stomach content composition and environmental temperature. Samples were collected in August/September of the years 2009, 2010 and 2011 in the north-eastern part of the central North Sea. Prey selection was assessed by identification of individual prey items in the stomach content to species. Ten feeding groups were identified consisting of individuals with one prey type dominating their stomach contents (≥75% by mass), of which six were used for growth analyses: “Sandeel”, “Clupeids”, “Norway pout”, “Flatfishes”, “Crustaceans” and “Brittle stars”. For each group, growth patterns were estimated based on measures of otolith growth increments. The
stomach contents showed that cod as a species are opportunistic in their prey selection, but at the same time indicated that the total, broad feeding niche width of the population is dominated by individual diet specialization and that many individuals temporally show a preference for a particular prey type. The contribution of invertebrates and particularly crustaceans decreased with increasing cod size, whereas that of fish and predominantly herring increased. Prey type had a significant effect on growth, while temperature had no effect. Slowest growth was observed in the cod group preying on sandeel, while cod preying on Norway pout showed the fastest growth. No significant difference was observed between groups preying on brittle stars, crustaceans, flatfishes and herring. Growth in the year before capture did however not differ between any of these groups. Across sampling years, growth chronology patterns were similar but not significantly influenced by temperatur
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Applied Ichthyology
Volume32
Issue number5
Pages (from-to)928-937
ISSN0175-8659
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Cite this

@article{246ed53f8da64b59b24f466335f9df1d,
title = "The influence of feeding behaviour on growth of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua, Linnaeus, 1758) in the North Sea",
abstract = "The objective of this study was to resolve key mechanisms driving individual growth patterns of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua). Growth dynamics were analysed by linking growth patterns with stomach content composition and environmental temperature. Samples were collected in August/September of the years 2009, 2010 and 2011 in the north-eastern part of the central North Sea. Prey selection was assessed by identification of individual prey items in the stomach content to species. Ten feeding groups were identified consisting of individuals with one prey type dominating their stomach contents (≥75{\%} by mass), of which six were used for growth analyses: “Sandeel”, “Clupeids”, “Norway pout”, “Flatfishes”, “Crustaceans” and “Brittle stars”. For each group, growth patterns were estimated based on measures of otolith growth increments. Thestomach contents showed that cod as a species are opportunistic in their prey selection, but at the same time indicated that the total, broad feeding niche width of the population is dominated by individual diet specialization and that many individuals temporally show a preference for a particular prey type. The contribution of invertebrates and particularly crustaceans decreased with increasing cod size, whereas that of fish and predominantly herring increased. Prey type had a significant effect on growth, while temperature had no effect. Slowest growth was observed in the cod group preying on sandeel, while cod preying on Norway pout showed the fastest growth. No significant difference was observed between groups preying on brittle stars, crustaceans, flatfishes and herring. Growth in the year before capture did however not differ between any of these groups. Across sampling years, growth chronology patterns were similar but not significantly influenced by temperatur",
author = "Karin H{\"u}ssy and Andersen, {Niels Gerner} and Pedersen, {Eva Maria}",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1111/jai.13160",
language = "English",
volume = "32",
pages = "928--937",
journal = "Journal of Applied Ichthyology",
issn = "0175-8659",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "5",

}

The influence of feeding behaviour on growth of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua, Linnaeus, 1758) in the North Sea. / Hüssy, Karin; Andersen, Niels Gerner; Pedersen, Eva Maria.

In: Journal of Applied Ichthyology, Vol. 32, No. 5, 2016, p. 928-937.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The influence of feeding behaviour on growth of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua, Linnaeus, 1758) in the North Sea

AU - Hüssy, Karin

AU - Andersen, Niels Gerner

AU - Pedersen, Eva Maria

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - The objective of this study was to resolve key mechanisms driving individual growth patterns of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua). Growth dynamics were analysed by linking growth patterns with stomach content composition and environmental temperature. Samples were collected in August/September of the years 2009, 2010 and 2011 in the north-eastern part of the central North Sea. Prey selection was assessed by identification of individual prey items in the stomach content to species. Ten feeding groups were identified consisting of individuals with one prey type dominating their stomach contents (≥75% by mass), of which six were used for growth analyses: “Sandeel”, “Clupeids”, “Norway pout”, “Flatfishes”, “Crustaceans” and “Brittle stars”. For each group, growth patterns were estimated based on measures of otolith growth increments. Thestomach contents showed that cod as a species are opportunistic in their prey selection, but at the same time indicated that the total, broad feeding niche width of the population is dominated by individual diet specialization and that many individuals temporally show a preference for a particular prey type. The contribution of invertebrates and particularly crustaceans decreased with increasing cod size, whereas that of fish and predominantly herring increased. Prey type had a significant effect on growth, while temperature had no effect. Slowest growth was observed in the cod group preying on sandeel, while cod preying on Norway pout showed the fastest growth. No significant difference was observed between groups preying on brittle stars, crustaceans, flatfishes and herring. Growth in the year before capture did however not differ between any of these groups. Across sampling years, growth chronology patterns were similar but not significantly influenced by temperatur

AB - The objective of this study was to resolve key mechanisms driving individual growth patterns of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua). Growth dynamics were analysed by linking growth patterns with stomach content composition and environmental temperature. Samples were collected in August/September of the years 2009, 2010 and 2011 in the north-eastern part of the central North Sea. Prey selection was assessed by identification of individual prey items in the stomach content to species. Ten feeding groups were identified consisting of individuals with one prey type dominating their stomach contents (≥75% by mass), of which six were used for growth analyses: “Sandeel”, “Clupeids”, “Norway pout”, “Flatfishes”, “Crustaceans” and “Brittle stars”. For each group, growth patterns were estimated based on measures of otolith growth increments. Thestomach contents showed that cod as a species are opportunistic in their prey selection, but at the same time indicated that the total, broad feeding niche width of the population is dominated by individual diet specialization and that many individuals temporally show a preference for a particular prey type. The contribution of invertebrates and particularly crustaceans decreased with increasing cod size, whereas that of fish and predominantly herring increased. Prey type had a significant effect on growth, while temperature had no effect. Slowest growth was observed in the cod group preying on sandeel, while cod preying on Norway pout showed the fastest growth. No significant difference was observed between groups preying on brittle stars, crustaceans, flatfishes and herring. Growth in the year before capture did however not differ between any of these groups. Across sampling years, growth chronology patterns were similar but not significantly influenced by temperatur

U2 - 10.1111/jai.13160

DO - 10.1111/jai.13160

M3 - Journal article

VL - 32

SP - 928

EP - 937

JO - Journal of Applied Ichthyology

JF - Journal of Applied Ichthyology

SN - 0175-8659

IS - 5

ER -