The impact of variation in added resistance computations on voyage performance prediction

Bhushan Taskar*, Pelle Bo Regener, Poul Andersen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingArticle in proceedingsResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Prediction of added resistance of a ship in waves is essential to evaluate vessel performance in a seaway. Also, added resistance in waves increases the fuel consumption. Today different methods are used to predict the added resistance of a ship in waves. Model tests play an important role, and researchers employ a range of computational methods, from two- dimensional potential flow in frequency domain to viscous time-domain CFD computations. These methods agree to a varying d gree for different wavelengths and wave headings. How much do these
differences in added resistance prediction affect the overall voyage performance prediction in a realistic weather condition and a practical route is an interesting question which has been addressed by this paper. The results give an idea about the importance of added resistance formulation on economic operations of ships.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPractical Design of Ships and Other Floating Structures. PRADS 2019. Lecture Notes in Civil Engineering
Place of PublicationSingapore
PublisherSpringer
Publication date2021
Pages133-149
ISBN (Print)978-981-15-4623-5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021
EventThe 14th International Symposium on Practical Design of Ships and Other Floating Structures (PRADS 2019) - Yokohama, Japan
Duration: 22 Sep 201926 Sep 2019

Conference

ConferenceThe 14th International Symposium on Practical Design of Ships and Other Floating Structures (PRADS 2019)
CountryJapan
CityYokohama
Period22/09/201926/09/2019
SeriesLecture Notes in Civil Engineering
Volume63
ISSN2366-2557

Keywords

  • Vessel performance
  • Added resistance
  • Accuracy and uncer- tainty
  • Route simulations

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The impact of variation in added resistance computations on voyage performance prediction'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this