The impact of noise power estimation on speech intelligibility in cochlear-implant speech coding strategies (L)

Thomas Bentsen, Stefan J. Mauger, Abigail A. Kressner*, Tobias May, Torsten Dau

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

The advanced combination encoder (ACE™) is an established speech-coding strategy in cochlear-implant processing that selects a number of frequency channels based on amplitudes. However, speech intelligibility outcomes with this strategy are limited in noisy conditions. To improve speech intelligibility, either noise-dominant channels can be attenuated prior to ACE™ with noise reduction or, alternatively, channels can be selected based on estimated signal-to-noise ratios. A noise power estimation stage is, therefore, required. This study investigated the impact of noise power estimation in noise-reduction and channel-selection strategies. Results imply that estimation with improved noise-tracking capabilities does not necessarily translate into increased speech intelligibility.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of the Acoustical Society of America
Volume145
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)818-821
Number of pages4
ISSN0001-4966
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Cite this

@article{6941873470cb4ce68fb8fddb5ceae982,
title = "The impact of noise power estimation on speech intelligibility in cochlear-implant speech coding strategies (L)",
abstract = "The advanced combination encoder (ACE™) is an established speech-coding strategy in cochlear-implant processing that selects a number of frequency channels based on amplitudes. However, speech intelligibility outcomes with this strategy are limited in noisy conditions. To improve speech intelligibility, either noise-dominant channels can be attenuated prior to ACE™ with noise reduction or, alternatively, channels can be selected based on estimated signal-to-noise ratios. A noise power estimation stage is, therefore, required. This study investigated the impact of noise power estimation in noise-reduction and channel-selection strategies. Results imply that estimation with improved noise-tracking capabilities does not necessarily translate into increased speech intelligibility.",
author = "Thomas Bentsen and Mauger, {Stefan J.} and Kressner, {Abigail A.} and Tobias May and Torsten Dau",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1121/1.5089887",
language = "English",
volume = "145",
pages = "818--821",
journal = "Acoustical Society of America. Journal",
issn = "0001-4966",
publisher = "A I P Publishing LLC",
number = "2",

}

The impact of noise power estimation on speech intelligibility in cochlear-implant speech coding strategies (L). / Bentsen, Thomas; Mauger, Stefan J.; Kressner, Abigail A.; May, Tobias; Dau, Torsten.

In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 145, No. 2, 2019, p. 818-821.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The impact of noise power estimation on speech intelligibility in cochlear-implant speech coding strategies (L)

AU - Bentsen, Thomas

AU - Mauger, Stefan J.

AU - Kressner, Abigail A.

AU - May, Tobias

AU - Dau, Torsten

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - The advanced combination encoder (ACE™) is an established speech-coding strategy in cochlear-implant processing that selects a number of frequency channels based on amplitudes. However, speech intelligibility outcomes with this strategy are limited in noisy conditions. To improve speech intelligibility, either noise-dominant channels can be attenuated prior to ACE™ with noise reduction or, alternatively, channels can be selected based on estimated signal-to-noise ratios. A noise power estimation stage is, therefore, required. This study investigated the impact of noise power estimation in noise-reduction and channel-selection strategies. Results imply that estimation with improved noise-tracking capabilities does not necessarily translate into increased speech intelligibility.

AB - The advanced combination encoder (ACE™) is an established speech-coding strategy in cochlear-implant processing that selects a number of frequency channels based on amplitudes. However, speech intelligibility outcomes with this strategy are limited in noisy conditions. To improve speech intelligibility, either noise-dominant channels can be attenuated prior to ACE™ with noise reduction or, alternatively, channels can be selected based on estimated signal-to-noise ratios. A noise power estimation stage is, therefore, required. This study investigated the impact of noise power estimation in noise-reduction and channel-selection strategies. Results imply that estimation with improved noise-tracking capabilities does not necessarily translate into increased speech intelligibility.

U2 - 10.1121/1.5089887

DO - 10.1121/1.5089887

M3 - Journal article

VL - 145

SP - 818

EP - 821

JO - Acoustical Society of America. Journal

JF - Acoustical Society of America. Journal

SN - 0001-4966

IS - 2

ER -