The February 2014 Cephalonia earthquake (Greece): 3D deformation field and source modeling from multiple SAR techniques

John Peter Merryman Boncori, Ioannis Papoutsis, Giuseppe Pezzo, Cristiano Tolomei, Simone Atzori, Athanassios Ganas, Vassilios Karastathis, Stefano Salvi, Charalampos Kontoes, A. Antonioli

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

On 26 January 2014 at 13:55 UTC, an Mw 6.0 earthquake struck the island of Cephalonia, Greece, followed five hours later by an Mw 5.3 aftershock and by an Mw 5.9 event on 3 February 2014 at 03:08 UTC (National Observatory of Athens, Institute of Geodynamics [NOA‐GI]). The epicenter of the Mw 6.0 event was relocated 2 km east of the town of Lixouri, and that of the Mw 5.9 event at the tip of the Gulf of Argostoli, in the northern part of the Paliki peninsula (Fig. 1; Karastathis et al., 2014; Papadopoulos et al., 2014). Extensive structural damage and widespread environmental effects were induced throughout the Paliki peninsula and along the eastern coast of the Gulf of Argostoli (Valkaniotis et al., 2014). Quays, sidewalks, and piers were damaged in the waterfront areas of the towns of Lixouri and Argostoli, the island capital, and liquefactions, road failures, rock falls, and small landslides were observed. Most of the latter effects took place in the aftermath of the 26 January 2014 event and were reactivated one week later by the 3 February earthquake.
Original languageEnglish
JournalSeismological Research Letters
Volume86
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)124-137
ISSN0895-0695
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

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