Temperature and Ca2+-dependence of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2(+)-ATPase in haddock, salmon, rainbow trout and zebra cichlid

Helene Godiksen, Flemming Jessen

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Abstract

Temperature dependence of Ca2+-ATPase from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in rabbit muscle has been widely studied, and it is generally accepted that a break point in Arrhenius plot exist at approximately 20 degreesC. Whether the break point arises as a result of temperature dependent changes in the enzyme or its membrane lipid environment is still a matter of discussion. In this study we compared the temperature dependence and Ca2+-dependence of SR Ca2+-ATPase in haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus), salmon (Salmo, salar), rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and zebra cichlid (Cichlasoma nigrofasciatum). The Arrhenius plot of zebra cichlid showed a break point at 20 degreesC, and the haddock Arrhenius plot was non-linear with pronounced changes in slope in the. temperature area, 6-14 degreesC. In Arrhenius plot from both salmon and rainbow trout a plateau exists with an almost constant SR Ca2+- ATPase activity. The temperature range of the plateau was 14-21 and 18-25 degreesC in salmon and rainbow trout, respectively. Ca2+-dependence in the four different fish species investigated was very similar with half maximal activation (K-0.5) between 0.2 and 0.6 muM and half maximal inhibition (I-0.5) between 60 and 250 muM. Results indicated that interaction between SR Ca2+-ATPase and its lipid environment may play an important role for the different Arrhenius plot of the different types of fish species investigated. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
JournalComparative Biochemistry and Physiology B-Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
Volume133
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)35-44
ISSN1096-4959
Publication statusPublished - 2002

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