Substitutions between dairy product subgroups and risk of type 2 diabetes: the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort

Daniel B. Ibsen, Anne Sofie D. Laursen, Lotte Lauritzen, Anne Tjonneland, Kim Overvad, Marianne Uhre Jakobsen

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the associations for specified substitutions between different subgroups of dairy products and the risk of type 2 diabetes. We used data from the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort including 54 277 men and women aged 50-64 years at baseline. Information regarding intake of dairy products was obtained from a validated FFQ, and cases of type 2 diabetes were identified through the Danish National Diabetes Register. Cox proportional hazards regressions were used to estimate associations. During a median follow-up of 15.3 years, 7137 cases were identified. Low-fat yogurt products in place of whole-fat yogurt products were associated with a higher rate of type 2 diabetes (hazard ratio (HR) 1.17; 95% CI 1.06, 1.29) per serving/d substituted. Whole-fat yogurt products in place of low-fat milk, whole-fat milk or buttermilk were associated with a lower rate of type 2 diabetes (HR 0.89; 95% CI 0.83, 0.96; HR 0.89; 95% CI 0.82, 0.96; HR 0.89; 95% CI 0.81, 0.97; per serving/d substituted, respectively). The pattern of associations was similar when intake was expressed as kJ/d (kcal/d). These findings suggest that intake of whole-fat yogurt products in place of low-fat yogurt products, low-fat milk, whole-fat milk and buttermilk are associated with a lower rate of type 2 diabetes.
Original languageEnglish
JournalBritish Journal of Nutrition
Volume118
Issue number11
Pages (from-to)989-997
Number of pages9
ISSN0007-1145
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cheese
  • Dairy products
  • Milk
  • Substitution studies
  • Yogurt

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