Study of the measured and perceived indoor air quality in Swedish school classrooms

Sarka Langer*, Lars Ekberg, Despoina Teli, Blanka Cabovska, Gabriel Bekö, Pawel Wargocki

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalConference articleResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

The influence of a classroom's indoor environment on children's health, performance and comfort is a concern that receives increasing attention. Many schools experience problems with inadequate indoor air quality and climate. Investigations of the indoor air quality (IAQ) in schools have been often non-systematic, which can lead to costly ad-hoc remediation actions. It is therefore important to develop a holistic approach to the assessment of IAQ in schools. 

This paper presents a field study on the indoor air quality and thermal environment conditions of elementary schools in Gothenburg, Sweden. The focus of the paper is on the methodology to investigate the IAQ using both objective measurements and subjective assessment of the perceived IAQ. The indoor environmental measurements include indoor air quality and thermal comfort parameters for which guideline values exist. Finally, a questionnaire was developed to evaluate the perception of the classroom's thermal environment and air quality by young children. 

The paper presents the study protocol and diagnostics approach for IAQ in classrooms. Examples of results from the first 10 investigated classrooms are presented.

Original languageEnglish
Article number032070
JournalIOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science
Volume588
Issue number3
Number of pages7
ISSN1755-1307
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020
Event Beyond 2020 : World Sustainable Built Environment - Online, Gothenburg, Sweden
Duration: 2 Nov 20204 Nov 2020

Conference

Conference Beyond 2020
LocationOnline
Country/TerritorySweden
CityGothenburg
Period02/11/202004/11/2020

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