Strong rotated cube textures in thin cold-rolled potassium-doped tungsten sheets during annealing up to 1300 °C

D. Tarras Madsen, U. M. Ciucani, A. Hoffmann, W. Pantleon*

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

Due to the high operation temperatures, microstructural changes will occur in tungsten when used as plasma-facing material in future fusion reactors. In drawn tungsten wires, potassium doping has proven to prevent such undesired changes effectively. This strategy has been adapted to thin cold-rolled tungsten sheets containing 80 ppm potassium. Their texture evolution during annealing is investigated using electron backscatter diffraction. In the as-rolled condition, a strong cube texture is present with a volume fraction of 67.0 % deviating maximal 15° from the rotated cube orientation. This texture intensifies strongly during isochronal annealing for 2 h at temperatures between 1000 °C and 1300 °C; the higher
the temperature, the higher the rotated cube fraction. The volume fraction of 94.8 % obtained after 2 h at 1300 °C does not change significantly during further annealing. These are remarkably strong textures for a body-centered cubic metal compared e.g. to commonly reported high volume fractions of 30 % for Goss orientations in silicon steels. Reliable quantification of such strong texture components requires analysis of orientations individually.
Original languageEnglish
Article number012018
JournalI O P Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering
Volume1121
Issue number1
Number of pages6
ISSN1757-8981
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021
Event19th International Conference on Textures of Materials (ICOTOM 19) - Virtual conference
Duration: 1 Mar 20214 Mar 2021

Conference

Conference19th International Conference on Textures of Materials (ICOTOM 19)
LocationVirtual conference
Period01/03/202104/03/2021

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