Storage affects the phenolic profiles and antioxidant activities of cherries (Prunus avium L) on human low-density lipoproteins

B. Goncalves, Anne-Katrine Regel Landbo, Mette Bruni Let, A.P. Silva, E. Rosa, Anne Boye Strunge Meyer

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Four sweet cherry cultivars (cvs), Burlat, Saco, Summit and Van, were analysed at harvest and after storage at 2 and 15degreesC for 30 and 6 days respectively. Phenolic profiles in methanolic extracts of freeze-dried samples of the fresh and differently stored cherries were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography. Hydroxycinnamates dominated in all samples and represented 60-74% by weight of the phenols in the fresh and stored samples of the cvs Saco, Summit and Van, and 45% by weight of the phenols in the cv Burlat samples, which were richer in anthocyanins. The relative and total levels of hydroxycinnamates, anthocyanins, flavonols and flavan-3-ols varied among cultivars and during storage. Storage at 15degreesC increased the phenol levels, particularly the cyanidin-3-rutinoside concentration. Cold storage induced decreased total phenol levels in the cvs Summit and Van but increased total phenol levels in the cvs Burlat and Saco. Phenolic cherry extracts inhibited low-density lipoprotein oxidation in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. Extracts of freshly harvested cherries exhibited significantly higher antioxidant activities than extracts of stored samples. The cv Summit samples had the highest antioxidant activity. Differences in the antioxidant effects of the cherry samples were positively correlated with their levels of p-coumaroylquinic acid (p <0.1) but negatively correlated with their cyanidin-3-rutinoside levels (p <0.05).
    Original languageEnglish
    JournalJournal of the Science of Food and Agriculture
    Volume84
    Pages (from-to)1013-1020
    ISSN0022-5142
    Publication statusPublished - 2004

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