Sound pressure distribution in a long, narrow hallway: Measurements versus results from a computer model with scattering from surface roughness and diffraction

Lily M. Wang, Jonathan Rathsam, Claus Lynge Christensen, Jens Holger Rindel

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    Abstract

    The sound pressure level distributrion down a long, narrow hallway due to a sound source at one end does not decrease linearly along the length of the hall. This characteristic may be due to the changing behaviour of scattering that occurs down the length of the hallway, which is distance- and angle-dependent. A new scatteing method that incorpoates these effects has been implemented in the room acoustic computer modeling program, ODEON [C. L. Christensen and J. H. Rindel, Forum Acusticum, Budapest (2005)]. A comparison of the results from an ODEON model with real-world measurements along a long, narrow hallway on the campus of the Technical Unoversity of Denmark is provided in this paper. [Work supported by the NSF]
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationJournal of the Acoustical Society of America
    Number of pages1998
    Volume118/3
    PublisherAcoustical Society of America
    Publication date2005
    Pages4aAA3
    Publication statusPublished - 2005
    Event150th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America - Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States
    Duration: 17 Oct 200521 Oct 2005
    Conference number: 150
    http://www.acoustics.org/press/150th/press_release.html

    Conference

    Conference150th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America
    Number150
    Country/TerritoryUnited States
    CityMinneapolis, Minnesota
    Period17/10/200521/10/2005
    Internet address

    Bibliographical note

    Copyright (2005) Acoustical Society of America. This article may be downloaded for personal use only. Any other use requires prior permission of the author and the Acoustical Society of America.

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