Simulation of the Initial 3-D Instability of an Impacting Drop Vortex Ring

Lorenz Sigurdson, Justin Wiwchar, Jens Honore Walther

Research output: Contribution to journalConference abstract in journalResearchpeer-review

74 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Computational vortex particle method simulations of a perturbed vortex ring are performed to recreate and understand the instability seen in impacting water drop experiments. Three fundamentally different initial vorticity distributions are used to attempt to trigger a Widnall instability, a Rayleigh centrifugal instability, or a vortex breakdown-type instability. Simulations which simply have a perturbed solitary ring result in an instability similar to that seen experimentally. Waviness of the core which would be expected from a Widnall instability is not visible. Adding an opposite-signed secondary vortex ring or an image vortex ring to the initial conditions, to trigger a Rayleigh or breakdown respectively, does not appear to significantly change the instability from what is seen with a solitary ring. This suggests that a Rayleigh or vortex breakdown-type instability are not likely at work, though tests are not conclusive. Perhaps the opposite-signed secondary vortex was not strong enough or placed appropriately. Elliptical streamlines , as expected, are visible in the core of the solitary ring at early times. Support from the Canadian Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council grant 41747 is gratefully acknowledged.
Original languageEnglish
Article numberAbstract: R6.00005
JournalAmerican Physical Society. Bulletin
Volume58
Issue number8
ISSN0003-0503
Publication statusPublished - 2013
Event66th Annual Meeting of the American Physical Society Division of Fluid Dynamics - Pittsburgh, PA, United States
Duration: 24 Nov 201326 Nov 2013
Conference number: 66

Conference

Conference66th Annual Meeting of the American Physical Society Division of Fluid Dynamics
Number66
CountryUnited States
CityPittsburgh, PA
Period24/11/201326/11/2013

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Simulation of the Initial 3-D Instability of an Impacting Drop Vortex Ring'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this