Separation of radiated sound field components from waves scattered by a source under non-anechoic conditions.

Efren Fernandez Grande (Invited author), Finn Jacobsen (Invited author)

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    Abstract

    A method of estimating the sound field radiated by a source under non-anechoic conditions has been examined. The method uses near field acoustic holography based on a combination of pressure and particle velocity measurements in a plane near the source for separating outgoing and ingoing wave components. The outgoing part of the sound field is composed of both radiated and scattered waves. The method compensates for the scattered components of the outgoing field on the basis of the boundary condition of the problem, exploiting the fact that the sound field is reconstructed very close to the source. Thus the radiated free-field component is estimated simultaneously with solving the inverse problem of reconstructing the sound field near the source. The method is particularly suited to cases in which the overall contribution of reflected sound in the measurement plane is significant.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationProceedings of Inter-Noise 2010
    Publication date2010
    Publication statusPublished - 2010
    Event39th International Congress and Exposition on Noise Control Engineering - Lisbon, Portugal
    Duration: 15 Jun 201016 Jun 2010
    Conference number: 39
    http://www.spacustica.pt/internoise2010/

    Conference

    Conference39th International Congress and Exposition on Noise Control Engineering
    Number39
    Country/TerritoryPortugal
    CityLisbon
    Period15/06/201016/06/2010
    Internet address

    Keywords

    • Sound field separation
    • Near-field Acoustic Holography (NAH)
    • Sound radiation

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