Sensory pollution from bag-type fiberglass ventilation filters: Conventional filter compared with filters containing various amounts of activated carbon

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

As ventilation filters accumulate particles removed from the airstream, they become emitters of sensory pollutants that degrade indoor air quality. Previously we demonstrated that an F7 bag-type filter that incorporates activated carbon (a "combination filter") reduces this adverse effect compared to an equivalent filter without carbon. The aim of the present study was to examine how the amount of activated carbon (AC) used in combination filters affects their ability to remove both sensory offending pollutants and ozone. A panel evaluated the air downstream of four different filters after each had continuously filtered outdoor suburban air over a period of 6 months. Interim assessments (mid-term evaluation) were performed after 3 months. During both assessments, four unused filters, identical in type to the loaded filters, were also evaluated. The evaluated filters included a conventional F7 fiberglass filter and three modifications of a bag-type fiberglass combination filter: the "Heavy" corresponded to a commercially available filter containing 400 g of carbon per square meter of filter area, the "Medium" contained half as much carbon (200 g/m(2)), and the "Light" contained a quarter as much carbon (100 g/m(2)). Each filter was weighed at the beginning of the soiling period and after 3 and 6 months of service. Additionally, up- and down-stream ozone concentrations and filter pressure drops were measured monthly. Following 6 months of service, the air downstream of each of the combination filters was judged to be significantly better than the air downstream of the 6-month-old F7 filter, and was comparable to that from an unused F7 filter. Additionally, the combination filters removed more ozone from the air than the F7 filter, with their respective fractional removal efficiencies roughly scaling with their carbon content.
Original languageEnglish
JournalBuilding and Environment
Volume44
Issue number10
Pages (from-to)2114-2120
ISSN0360-1323
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Keywords

  • Ozone removal efficiency
  • Activated carbon filter
  • Perceived air quality
  • Ventilation filters
  • Supply air quality
  • Sensory pollution

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Sensory pollution from bag-type fiberglass ventilation filters: Conventional filter compared with filters containing various amounts of activated carbon'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this