Seawater-Soluble Pigments and Their Potential Use in Self-Polishing Antifouling Paints: Simulation-based Screening Tool

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearch

Abstract

This work concerns the on-going development of efficient and environmentally friendly antifouling paints for biofouling control on large ocean-going ships. It is illustrated how a detailed mathematical model for a self-polishing antifouling paint exposed to seawater can be used as a product engineering tool to obtain a quick estimate of the paint behaviour that a given seawater-soluble pigment will provide. In the present context, "pigment" refers to relevant particulate solids of organic-, inorganic-, or biological nature. Simulations performed at 15 and 30degreesC suggest that pigment solubility and seawater diffusivity of dissolved pigment species have a significant influence on the polishing and leaching behaviour of a typical self-polishing paint system. The pigment size distribution, on the other hand, only has a minor influence on the paint-seawater interaction. Simulations also indicate that only compounds which are effective against biofouling at very low seawater concentrations are useful as active antifouling paint ingredients. The need for model verification and exploration of practical issues, subsequent a given pigment has been found of interest, is discussed. The model approach is of relevance in the search for novel antifouling paints and for the development of accelerated test methods. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
JournalProgress in Organic Coatings
Volume45
Issue number0
Pages (from-to)423-434
ISSN0300-9440
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

Cite this

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title = "Seawater-Soluble Pigments and Their Potential Use in Self-Polishing Antifouling Paints: Simulation-based Screening Tool",
abstract = "This work concerns the on-going development of efficient and environmentally friendly antifouling paints for biofouling control on large ocean-going ships. It is illustrated how a detailed mathematical model for a self-polishing antifouling paint exposed to seawater can be used as a product engineering tool to obtain a quick estimate of the paint behaviour that a given seawater-soluble pigment will provide. In the present context, {"}pigment{"} refers to relevant particulate solids of organic-, inorganic-, or biological nature. Simulations performed at 15 and 30degreesC suggest that pigment solubility and seawater diffusivity of dissolved pigment species have a significant influence on the polishing and leaching behaviour of a typical self-polishing paint system. The pigment size distribution, on the other hand, only has a minor influence on the paint-seawater interaction. Simulations also indicate that only compounds which are effective against biofouling at very low seawater concentrations are useful as active antifouling paint ingredients. The need for model verification and exploration of practical issues, subsequent a given pigment has been found of interest, is discussed. The model approach is of relevance in the search for novel antifouling paints and for the development of accelerated test methods. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.",
author = "S{\o}ren Kiil and Kim Dam-Johansen and {Erik Weinell}, Claus and Pedersen, {Michael S.}",
year = "2002",
doi = "10.1016/S0300-9440(02)00146-7",
language = "English",
volume = "45",
pages = "423--434",
journal = "Progress in Organic Coatings",
issn = "0300-9440",
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Seawater-Soluble Pigments and Their Potential Use in Self-Polishing Antifouling Paints: Simulation-based Screening Tool. / Kiil, Søren; Dam-Johansen, Kim; Erik Weinell, Claus; Pedersen, Michael S.

In: Progress in Organic Coatings, Vol. 45, No. 0, 2002, p. 423-434.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearch

TY - JOUR

T1 - Seawater-Soluble Pigments and Their Potential Use in Self-Polishing Antifouling Paints: Simulation-based Screening Tool

AU - Kiil, Søren

AU - Dam-Johansen, Kim

AU - Erik Weinell, Claus

AU - Pedersen, Michael S.

PY - 2002

Y1 - 2002

N2 - This work concerns the on-going development of efficient and environmentally friendly antifouling paints for biofouling control on large ocean-going ships. It is illustrated how a detailed mathematical model for a self-polishing antifouling paint exposed to seawater can be used as a product engineering tool to obtain a quick estimate of the paint behaviour that a given seawater-soluble pigment will provide. In the present context, "pigment" refers to relevant particulate solids of organic-, inorganic-, or biological nature. Simulations performed at 15 and 30degreesC suggest that pigment solubility and seawater diffusivity of dissolved pigment species have a significant influence on the polishing and leaching behaviour of a typical self-polishing paint system. The pigment size distribution, on the other hand, only has a minor influence on the paint-seawater interaction. Simulations also indicate that only compounds which are effective against biofouling at very low seawater concentrations are useful as active antifouling paint ingredients. The need for model verification and exploration of practical issues, subsequent a given pigment has been found of interest, is discussed. The model approach is of relevance in the search for novel antifouling paints and for the development of accelerated test methods. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

AB - This work concerns the on-going development of efficient and environmentally friendly antifouling paints for biofouling control on large ocean-going ships. It is illustrated how a detailed mathematical model for a self-polishing antifouling paint exposed to seawater can be used as a product engineering tool to obtain a quick estimate of the paint behaviour that a given seawater-soluble pigment will provide. In the present context, "pigment" refers to relevant particulate solids of organic-, inorganic-, or biological nature. Simulations performed at 15 and 30degreesC suggest that pigment solubility and seawater diffusivity of dissolved pigment species have a significant influence on the polishing and leaching behaviour of a typical self-polishing paint system. The pigment size distribution, on the other hand, only has a minor influence on the paint-seawater interaction. Simulations also indicate that only compounds which are effective against biofouling at very low seawater concentrations are useful as active antifouling paint ingredients. The need for model verification and exploration of practical issues, subsequent a given pigment has been found of interest, is discussed. The model approach is of relevance in the search for novel antifouling paints and for the development of accelerated test methods. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

U2 - 10.1016/S0300-9440(02)00146-7

DO - 10.1016/S0300-9440(02)00146-7

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JO - Progress in Organic Coatings

JF - Progress in Organic Coatings

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