Risk factors associated with interdog aggression and shooting phobias among purebred dogs in Denmark

Helene Rugbjerg, Helle Friis Proschowsky, Annette Kjær Ersbøll, Jørgen D. Lund

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

    Abstract

    The prevalence of behaviour problems is reported from a questionnaire study among members of the Danish Kennel Club (DKC). In total, 4359 dog owners were included in the analyses. With logistic regression, we analysed four behaviour problems: dominance towards the owner, interdog dominance aggression, separation anxiety and shooting phobia. Compared to Labrador Retrievers, the following breeds and breed groups had higher odds of being reported to have interdog dominance aggression: Belgian Sheepdogs, Dachshunds, Dalmatians, German, Shepherds, Hovawarts, Pinschers, Rottweilers, Scent dogs and Spitz dogs. Poodles, retrieving/flushing dogs, Sheepdogs, Spitz dogs and terriers had higher odds of shooting phobia. The odds of interdog dominance aggression were higher among dogs owned by younger dog owners compared to dogs owned by older dog owners. Dogs living in the capital area of Copenhagen had increased odds of interdog dominance aggression as compared to dogs living in other parts of Denmark. Dogs belonging to owners with limited knowledge of the breed before acquiring the dog had higher odds of interdog dominance aggression. Dogs attending obedience training classes had reduced odds of shooting phobia. Dogs belonging to dog breeders had reduced odds of being reported to have the investigated behaviour problems.
    Original languageEnglish
    JournalPreventive Veterinary Medicine
    Volume58
    Issue number1-2
    Pages (from-to)85-100
    ISSN0167-5877
    Publication statusPublished - 2003

    Keywords

    • dogs
    • prevention
    • human-animal interaction
    • behaviour problems
    • risk factors

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