Retinoid metabolism in invertebrates: When evolution meets endocrine disruption

A. Andre, R. Ruivo, Manuel Gesto, L. Filipe C. Castro, M.M. Santos

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Recent genomic and biochemical evidence in invertebrate species pushes back the origin of the retinoid metabolic and signaling modules to the last common ancestor of all bilaterians. However, the evolution of retinoid pathways are far from fully understood. In the majority of non-chordate invertebrate lineages, the ongoing functional characterization of retinoid-related genes (metabolism and signaling pathways), as well as the characterization of the endogenous retinoid content (precursors and active retinoids), is still incomplete. Despite limited, the available data supports the presence of biologically active retinoid pathways in invertebrates. Yet, the mechanisms controlling the spatial and temporal distribution of retinoids as well as their physiological significance share similarities and differences with vertebrates. For instance, retinol storage in the form of retinyl esters, a key feature for the maintenance of retinoid homeostatic balance in vertebrates, was only recently demonstrated in some mollusk species, suggesting that such ability is older than previously anticipated. In contrast, the enzymatic repertoire involved in this process is probably unlike that of vertebrates. The suggested ancestry of active retinoid pathways implies that many more metazoan species might be potential targets for endocrine disrupting chemicals. Here, we review the current knowledge about the occurrence and functionality of retinoid metabolic and signaling pathways in invertebrate lineages, paying special attention to the evolutionary origin of retinoid storage mechanisms. Additionally, we summarize existing information on the endocrine disruption of invertebrate retinoid modules by environmental chemicals. Research priorities in the field are highlighted. (C) 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
JournalMolecular and Cellular Probes
Volume208
Issue number8
Pages (from-to)134-145
ISSN0890-8508
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • ENDOCRINOLOGY
  • COA-DIACYLGLYCEROL ACYLTRANSFERASE
  • VERTEBRATE VISUAL CYCLE
  • ACID SIGNALING PATHWAY
  • LIGAND-BINDING DOMAIN
  • X-RECEPTOR RXR
  • VITAMIN-A
  • NUCELLA-LAPILLUS
  • GENE-EXPRESSION
  • NUCLEAR RECEPTORS
  • EMBRYONIC-DEVELOPMENT
  • Evolution
  • Endocrine disruption
  • Invertebrates
  • Retinoid pathways
  • Endocrinology
  • Medicine (all)
  • endocrine disruptor
  • retinoid
  • retinol
  • biochemical composition
  • Cephalochordata
  • Ecdysozoa
  • human
  • invertebrate
  • Lophotrochozoa
  • molecular evolution
  • mollusc
  • nonhuman
  • Review
  • signal transduction
  • sponge (Porifera)
  • Urochordata
  • vitamin metabolism
  • animal
  • evolution
  • metabolism
  • vertebrate
  • Animals
  • Biological Evolution
  • Endocrine Disruptors
  • Retinoids
  • Signal Transduction
  • Vertebrates
  • endocrine disruption
  • evolutionary origin
  • spatial and temporal distribution
  • Animalia (Animals, Invertebrates) - Invertebrata [34000] invertebrate common
  • Invertebrata Animalia (Animals, Invertebrates) - Metazoa [36000] metazoan common
  • Invertebrata Animalia (Animals, Invertebrates, Mollusks) - Mollusca [61000] mollusk common
  • retinoid metabolism
  • retinol 68-26-8
  • 01500, Evolution
  • 10060, Biochemistry studies - General
  • 10066, Biochemistry studies - Lipids
  • 17002, Endocrine - General
  • 64001, Invertebrata: comparative, experimental morphology, physiology and pathology - General
  • 64026, Invertebrata: comparative, experimental morphology, physiology and pathology - Mollusca
  • Chemical Coordination and Homeostasis
  • Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics
  • Endocrine System
  • Evolution and Adaptation

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