Resistance of potential probiotic lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria of African and European origin to antimicrobials: Determination and transferability of the resistance genes to other bacteria

Labia Irene Ivette Ouoba, Vicki Lei, Lars Bogø Jensen

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Probiotic bacteria and starter cultures of Lactobacillus, Weissella and Bifidobacterium of African and European origins were studied and compared for their susceptibility to antimicrobials. The study included, for all isolates, determination of MICs (Minimal Inhibitory Concentration) for 24 antimicrobials, detection of resistance genes by PCR reactions using specific primers and sequencing of positive amplicons. The ability of Lb. reuteri from Africa to transfer the erythromycin resistance gene erm(B) to closely related bacteria was investigated by conjugation. Variations were observed and high levels of intrinsic resistance were found among the tested species. Positive amplicons were obtained for resistance genes encoding aminoglycoside (aph(3')-III, aadA, aadE) and tetracycline (tet(S)) from isolates from Europe and macrolide (erm(B)) from an isolate from Africa. However, only the erm(B) gene found in Lb. reuteri L4: 12002 from Africa contained a homologous sequence to previously published sequences. This gene could be transferred in vitro to enterococci. Higher prevalence of phenotypic resistance for aminoglycoside was found in isolates from Europe. (C) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Food Microbiology
Volume121
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)217-224
ISSN0168-1605
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

Keywords

  • Lactic acid bacteria
  • Africa
  • Europe
  • Antimicrobials resistance
  • Horizontal gene transfer

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