Quantifying the Financial Savings of Motion Correction in Brain MRI: A Model-Based Estimate of the Costs Arising From Patient Head Motion and Potential Savings From Implementation of Motion Correction

Jakob M. Slipsager*, Stefan L. Glimberg, Jes Søgaard, Rasmus R. Paulsen, Helle H. Johannesen, Pernille C. Martens, Alka Seth, Lisbeth Marner, Otto M. Henriksen, Oline V. Olesen, Liselotte Højgaard

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Background: Patient head motion is a major concern in clinical brain MRI, as it reduces the diagnostic image quality and may increase examination time and cost. Purpose: To investigate the prevalence of MR images with significant motion artifacts on a given clinical scanner and to estimate the potential financial cost savings of applying motion correction to clinical brain MRI examinations. Study Type: Retrospective. Subjects: In all, 173 patients undergoing a PET/MRI dementia protocol and 55 pediatric patients undergoing a PET/MRI brain tumor protocol. The total scan time of the two protocols were 17 and 40 minutes, respectively. Field Strength/Sequences: 3 T, Siemens mMR Biograph, MPRAGE, DWI, T1 and T2-weighted FLAIR, T2-weighted 2D-FLASH, T2-weighted TSE. Assessment: A retrospective review of image sequences from a given clinical MRI scanner was conducted to investigate the prevalence of motion-corrupted images. The review was performed by three radiologists with different levels of experience using a three-step semiquantitative scale to classify the quality of the images. A total of 1013 sequences distributed on 228 MRI examinations were reviewed. The potential cost savings of motion correction were estimated by a cost estimation for our country with assumptions. Statistical Test: The cost estimation was conducted with a 20% lower and upper bound on the model assumptions to include the uncertainty of the assumptions. Results: 7.9% of the sequences had motion artifacts that decreased the interpretability, while 2.0% of the sequences had motion artifacts causing the images to be nondiagnostic. The estimated annual cost to the clinic/hospital due to patient head motion per scanner was $45,066 without pediatric examinations and $364,242 with pediatric examinations. Data Conclusion: The prevalence of a motion-corrupted image was found in 2.0% of the reviewed sequences. Based on the model, repayment periods are presented as a function of the price for applying motion correction and its performance. Evidence Level: 4. Technical Efficacy: Stage 6.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Volume52
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)731-738
ISSN1053-1807
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2020

Keywords

  • Cost saving
  • Motion artifacts
  • Motion correction
  • MRI
  • Neuroimaging

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Quantifying the Financial Savings of Motion Correction in Brain MRI: A Model-Based Estimate of the Costs Arising From Patient Head Motion and Potential Savings From Implementation of Motion Correction'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this