Quantification of dermal exposure to nanoparticles from solid nanocomposites by using single particle ICP-MS

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Abstract

Engineered nanoparticles are used in various applications due to their unique properties, which has led to their widespread use in consumer products. Silver, titanium and copper-based nanoparticles are few of the most commonly used nanomaterials in consumer products, mainly due to their biocidal, optical or photocatalytical properties. There is a lot of research focusing on effects exerted by nanoparticles, but the knowledge concerning release and subsequential exposure to nanoparticles is very limited, and information regarding potential dermal exposure from nanomaterial containing solid articles in particular is currently lacking. Challenges with regard to qualitative and quantitative characterization of nanoparticle exposure have been increasingly addressed in the literature in the last decade, and single particle ICP-MS has shown to be one of the most promising techniques for nanoparticle detection and characterization.
In this study, we have investigated the potential dermal exposure to three different types of nano-enabled consumer products: Ag-containing keyboard covers, TiO2 coated ceramic tiles, and wood painted with CuO containing paint. The potential for dermal transfer from the aforementioned surfaces was tested by surface wiping followed by analysis using single particle ICP-MS. The nanoparticles were extracted from the wipes by ultrasonication in deionized water, and this technique was tested to be around 60-100% effective for extracting the particles adsorbed to the wipes. The method was optimized by spiking the wipes with known amounts of nanoparticles and treating them the same way as the experimental samples. Our preliminary results show that single particle ICP-MS has the potential for quantitatively measuring potential dermal exposure to nanoparticles, and when used in combination with other characterization techniques, such as conventional ICP-MS (for analysis of total metal content) and electron microscopy (particle shape) it can provide necessary particle characterization that can aid consumer exposure assessment to nanoparticles.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication11th International Conference on the Environmental Effects of Nanoparticles and Nanomaterials (ICEENN 2016) : Abstract program
Place of PublicationColorado, USA
Publication date2016
Pages64-64
Publication statusPublished - 2016
Event11th International Conference on the Environmental Effects of Nanoparticles and Nanomaterials - Golden, United States
Duration: 14 Aug 201618 Aug 2016
Conference number: 11

Conference

Conference11th International Conference on the Environmental Effects of Nanoparticles and Nanomaterials
Number11
CountryUnited States
CityGolden
Period14/08/201618/08/2016

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