Porcine Circovirus Diseases: A review of PMWS

P. Baekbo, C. S. Kristensen, L. E. Larsen

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    This article is a review on post‐weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS), the first described disease among the porcine circovirus diseases (PCVD). Post‐weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome has, since its appearance in Canada in 1991, been seen in all major pig producing countries. To diagnose PMWS at herd level typical clinical appearance consisting of wasting and increased mortality must be combined with finding at autopsy of diseased pigs, where typical microscopic findings in the lymphatic tissue must be present. Post‐weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome significantly increases the mortality and reduces the daily weight gain in weaner pig and/or in finishing pigs. Post‐weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome can be transmitted by pig‐to‐pig contact and some studies point at airborne transmission as a possibility. Studies in Europe have shown several risk factors that either increase or decrease the risk for a pig herd to be affected by PMWS. At the pig level, studies have shown the importance of maternal immunity as protection for subsequent development of PMWS. To control PMWS, good production management and control of other diseases are crucial. Since 2004, commercial vaccines against Porcine Circo Virus type 2 have been coming on the market and many studies have shown great benefits of these to control PMWS. Today, sow vaccines as well as piglet vaccines are available in most countries. An extensive meta‐analysis of many of the vaccines has shown a comparable good efficacy of the vaccines in significantly reducing mortality and increasing weight gain of the pigs.
    Original languageEnglish
    JournalTransboundary and Emerging Diseases
    Volume59
    Issue numberSupplement s1
    Pages (from-to)60-67
    ISSN1865-1674
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2012

    Bibliographical note

    Special Issue: Emerging And Re-Emerging Pig Viral Infections.

    Keywords

    • PCV2
    • PMWS
    • Pigs
    • Review
    • Genotypes

    Cite this

    Baekbo, P. ; Kristensen, C. S. ; Larsen, L. E. / Porcine Circovirus Diseases: A review of PMWS. In: Transboundary and Emerging Diseases. 2012 ; Vol. 59, No. Supplement s1. pp. 60-67.
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    Porcine Circovirus Diseases: A review of PMWS. / Baekbo, P.; Kristensen, C. S.; Larsen, L. E.

    In: Transboundary and Emerging Diseases, Vol. 59, No. Supplement s1, 2012, p. 60-67.

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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