Polymorphisms in the fatty acid desaturase genes and diet are important determinants of infant docosahexaenoic acid status

L. Lauritzen, L. Harsløf, L.H. Larsen, C. Ritz, Lars Hellgren, K. F. Michaelsen, U. Vogel

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    Abstract

    Tissue docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) accretion in early infancy is supported by DHA in breast-milk and may thus decrease once complementary feeding
    takes over. Endogenous synthesis of DHA from alphalinolenic acid is low and polymorphisms in the genes that encodes the fatty acid desaturases (FADS) has been shown to have little effect on DHA-status in adults. It is unclear to what
    extent endogenous DHA-synthesis contributes to infant DHAstatus. We aim to investigate the role of diet and FADS-polymorphisms on DHA-status at 9 months and 3 years. Methods: This cross-sectional study with Danish infants use data from two prospective studies (EFiON and the SKOTcohort). We measured erythrocyte (RBC) DHA-status at 9 months (n=409) and 3 years (n=176) and genotyped 4 FADS tagSNPs, rs3834458, rs1535, rs174575 and rs174448 (n=401).
    Original languageEnglish
    Article numberPO133
    JournalAnnals of Nutrition and Metabolism
    Volume63
    Issue numberSuppl. 1
    Pages (from-to)320-321
    ISSN0250-6807
    Publication statusPublished - 2013
    EventIUNS 20th International Congress of Nutrition - Granada, Spain
    Duration: 15 Sep 201320 Sep 2013
    Conference number: 20
    http://icn2013.com/

    Conference

    ConferenceIUNS 20th International Congress of Nutrition
    Number20
    Country/TerritorySpain
    CityGranada
    Period15/09/201320/09/2013
    Internet address

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