POD analysis of flow structures behind cylinders with concave fillets

Knud Erik Meyer, Celeste Burlina, Christos T. Georgakis

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    Abstract

    Surface modifications of cylinders using fillets are investigated with respect to flow structures in a cross flow to a cylinder. Three cylinders are used: a plain cylinder, a cylinder with a helical fillet and a cylinder with a helical staggered pattern of small fillets in tangential direction. The flow field in the wake region is measured with Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in both a plane normal to the cylinder and a plane in the wake shear layer perpendicular to the free stream direction. Three different Reynolds numbers in the range from 0000 to 120000 are used. The helical fillet modifies the wake to be more narrow and longer and with less turbulent kinetic energy in the wake. The staggered fillet modifies the shear layers forming at the sides of the cylinder to contain three-dimensional structures. This reduces vortex shedding significantly resulting in even less turbulent kinetic in the ake. Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) is shown to be an effective method for describing three-dimensional time varying flow structures using non-time-resolving planar measurements.
    Original languageEnglish
    Publication date2018
    Number of pages12
    Publication statusPublished - 2018
    Event19th International Symposium on the Application of Laser and Imaging Techniques to Fluid Mechanics - Lisbon, Portugal
    Duration: 16 Jul 201819 Jul 2018

    Conference

    Conference19th International Symposium on the Application of Laser and Imaging Techniques to Fluid Mechanics
    Country/TerritoryPortugal
    CityLisbon
    Period16/07/201819/07/2018

    Keywords

    • Surface modification
    • Cable aerodynamics
    • Particle Image Velocimetry
    • Proper Orthogonal Decomposition

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