Photothermal Transport of DNA in Entropy-Landscape Plasmonic Waveguides

Cameron Smith, Anil Haraksingh Thilsted, Jonas Nyvold Pedersen, Tomas Hugh Youngman, Julia C. Dyrnum, Nicolai A. Michaelsen, Rodolphe Marie, Anders Kristensen

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

The ability to handle single, free molecules in lab-on-a-chip systems is key to the development of advanced biotechnologies. Entropic confinement offers passive control of polymers in nanofluidic systems by locally asserting a molecule's number of available conformation states through structured landscapes. Separately, a range of plasmonic configurations have demonstrated active manipulation of nano-objects by harnessing concentrated electric fields. The integration of these two independent techniques promises a range of sophisticated and complementary functions to handle, for example, DNA, but numerous difficulties, in particular, conflicting requirements of channel size, have prevented progress. Here, we show that metallic V-groove waveguides, embedded in fluidic nanoslits, form entropic potentials that trap and guide DNA molecules over well-defined routes while simultaneously promoting photothermal transport of DNA through the losses of plasmonic modes. The propulsive forces, assisted by in-coupling to propagating channel plasmon polaritons, extend along the V-grooves with a directed motion up to ≈0.5 μm·mW-1 away from the input beam and λ-DNA velocities reaching ≈0.2 μm·s-1·mW-1. The entropic trapping enables the V-grooves to be flexibly loaded and unloaded with DNA by variation of transverse fluid flow, a process that is selective to biopolymers versus fixed-shape objects and also allows the technique to address the challenges of nanoscale interaction volumes. Our self-aligning, light-driven actuator provides a convenient platform to filter, route, and manipulate individual molecules and may be realized wholly by wafer-scale fabrication suitable for parallelized investigation.
Original languageEnglish
JournalA C S Nano
Pages (from-to)4553-4563
Number of pages11
ISSN1936-0851
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Keywords

  • V-groove
  • Channel plasmon polariton
  • Entropic trapping
  • Nanoconfined DNA
  • Nanofluidics
  • Photothermal effect

Cite this

Smith, Cameron ; Thilsted, Anil Haraksingh ; Pedersen, Jonas Nyvold ; Youngman, Tomas Hugh ; Dyrnum, Julia C. ; Michaelsen, Nicolai A. ; Marie, Rodolphe ; Kristensen, Anders. / Photothermal Transport of DNA in Entropy-Landscape Plasmonic Waveguides. In: A C S Nano. 2017 ; pp. 4553-4563.
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title = "Photothermal Transport of DNA in Entropy-Landscape Plasmonic Waveguides",
abstract = "The ability to handle single, free molecules in lab-on-a-chip systems is key to the development of advanced biotechnologies. Entropic confinement offers passive control of polymers in nanofluidic systems by locally asserting a molecule's number of available conformation states through structured landscapes. Separately, a range of plasmonic configurations have demonstrated active manipulation of nano-objects by harnessing concentrated electric fields. The integration of these two independent techniques promises a range of sophisticated and complementary functions to handle, for example, DNA, but numerous difficulties, in particular, conflicting requirements of channel size, have prevented progress. Here, we show that metallic V-groove waveguides, embedded in fluidic nanoslits, form entropic potentials that trap and guide DNA molecules over well-defined routes while simultaneously promoting photothermal transport of DNA through the losses of plasmonic modes. The propulsive forces, assisted by in-coupling to propagating channel plasmon polaritons, extend along the V-grooves with a directed motion up to ≈0.5 μm·mW-1 away from the input beam and λ-DNA velocities reaching ≈0.2 μm·s-1·mW-1. The entropic trapping enables the V-grooves to be flexibly loaded and unloaded with DNA by variation of transverse fluid flow, a process that is selective to biopolymers versus fixed-shape objects and also allows the technique to address the challenges of nanoscale interaction volumes. Our self-aligning, light-driven actuator provides a convenient platform to filter, route, and manipulate individual molecules and may be realized wholly by wafer-scale fabrication suitable for parallelized investigation.",
keywords = "V-groove, Channel plasmon polariton, Entropic trapping, Nanoconfined DNA, Nanofluidics, Photothermal effect",
author = "Cameron Smith and Thilsted, {Anil Haraksingh} and Pedersen, {Jonas Nyvold} and Youngman, {Tomas Hugh} and Dyrnum, {Julia C.} and Michaelsen, {Nicolai A.} and Rodolphe Marie and Anders Kristensen",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1021/acsnano.6b08563",
language = "English",
pages = "4553--4563",
journal = "A C S Nano",
issn = "1936-0851",
publisher = "American Chemical Society",

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Photothermal Transport of DNA in Entropy-Landscape Plasmonic Waveguides. / Smith, Cameron; Thilsted, Anil Haraksingh; Pedersen, Jonas Nyvold; Youngman, Tomas Hugh; Dyrnum, Julia C. ; Michaelsen, Nicolai A.; Marie, Rodolphe ; Kristensen, Anders.

In: A C S Nano, 2017, p. 4553-4563.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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T1 - Photothermal Transport of DNA in Entropy-Landscape Plasmonic Waveguides

AU - Smith, Cameron

AU - Thilsted, Anil Haraksingh

AU - Pedersen, Jonas Nyvold

AU - Youngman, Tomas Hugh

AU - Dyrnum, Julia C.

AU - Michaelsen, Nicolai A.

AU - Marie, Rodolphe

AU - Kristensen, Anders

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - The ability to handle single, free molecules in lab-on-a-chip systems is key to the development of advanced biotechnologies. Entropic confinement offers passive control of polymers in nanofluidic systems by locally asserting a molecule's number of available conformation states through structured landscapes. Separately, a range of plasmonic configurations have demonstrated active manipulation of nano-objects by harnessing concentrated electric fields. The integration of these two independent techniques promises a range of sophisticated and complementary functions to handle, for example, DNA, but numerous difficulties, in particular, conflicting requirements of channel size, have prevented progress. Here, we show that metallic V-groove waveguides, embedded in fluidic nanoslits, form entropic potentials that trap and guide DNA molecules over well-defined routes while simultaneously promoting photothermal transport of DNA through the losses of plasmonic modes. The propulsive forces, assisted by in-coupling to propagating channel plasmon polaritons, extend along the V-grooves with a directed motion up to ≈0.5 μm·mW-1 away from the input beam and λ-DNA velocities reaching ≈0.2 μm·s-1·mW-1. The entropic trapping enables the V-grooves to be flexibly loaded and unloaded with DNA by variation of transverse fluid flow, a process that is selective to biopolymers versus fixed-shape objects and also allows the technique to address the challenges of nanoscale interaction volumes. Our self-aligning, light-driven actuator provides a convenient platform to filter, route, and manipulate individual molecules and may be realized wholly by wafer-scale fabrication suitable for parallelized investigation.

AB - The ability to handle single, free molecules in lab-on-a-chip systems is key to the development of advanced biotechnologies. Entropic confinement offers passive control of polymers in nanofluidic systems by locally asserting a molecule's number of available conformation states through structured landscapes. Separately, a range of plasmonic configurations have demonstrated active manipulation of nano-objects by harnessing concentrated electric fields. The integration of these two independent techniques promises a range of sophisticated and complementary functions to handle, for example, DNA, but numerous difficulties, in particular, conflicting requirements of channel size, have prevented progress. Here, we show that metallic V-groove waveguides, embedded in fluidic nanoslits, form entropic potentials that trap and guide DNA molecules over well-defined routes while simultaneously promoting photothermal transport of DNA through the losses of plasmonic modes. The propulsive forces, assisted by in-coupling to propagating channel plasmon polaritons, extend along the V-grooves with a directed motion up to ≈0.5 μm·mW-1 away from the input beam and λ-DNA velocities reaching ≈0.2 μm·s-1·mW-1. The entropic trapping enables the V-grooves to be flexibly loaded and unloaded with DNA by variation of transverse fluid flow, a process that is selective to biopolymers versus fixed-shape objects and also allows the technique to address the challenges of nanoscale interaction volumes. Our self-aligning, light-driven actuator provides a convenient platform to filter, route, and manipulate individual molecules and may be realized wholly by wafer-scale fabrication suitable for parallelized investigation.

KW - V-groove

KW - Channel plasmon polariton

KW - Entropic trapping

KW - Nanoconfined DNA

KW - Nanofluidics

KW - Photothermal effect

U2 - 10.1021/acsnano.6b08563

DO - 10.1021/acsnano.6b08563

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 28453288

SP - 4553

EP - 4563

JO - A C S Nano

JF - A C S Nano

SN - 1936-0851

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