Photoregulation in a Kleptochloroplastidic Dinoflagellate, Dinophysis acuta

Per J. Hansen, Karin Ojamae, Terje Berge, Erik C. L. Trampe, Lasse Tor Nielsen, Inga Lips, Michael Kühl

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Abstract

Some phagotrophic organisms can retain chloroplasts of their photosynthetic prey as so-called kleptochloroplasts and maintain their function for shorter or longer periods of time. Here we show for the first time that the dinoflagellate Dinophysis acute takes control over "third-hand" chloroplasts obtained from its ciliate prey Mesodinium spp. that originally ingested the cryptophyte chloroplasts. With its kleptochloroplasts, D. acuta can synthesize photosynthetic as well as photoprotective pigments under long-term starvation in the light. Variable chlorophyll fluorescence measurements showed that the kleptochloroplasts were fully functional during 1 month of prey starvation, while the chlorophyll a-specific inorganic carbon uptake decreased within days of prey starvation under an irradiance of 100 mu mol photons m(-2) s(-1). While a acute cells can regulate their pigmentation and function of kleptochloroplasts they apparently lose the ability to maintain high inorganic carbon fixation rates.
Original languageEnglish
Article number785
JournalFrontiers in Microbiology
Volume7
Pages (from-to)1-11
ISSN1664-302X
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Keywords

  • Dinophysis
  • acquired phototrophy
  • kleptochloroplasts
  • photoregulation
  • photosynthesis
  • MICROBIOLOGY
  • CILIATE MYRIONECTA-RUBRA
  • MESODINIUM-RUBRUM
  • MARINE-PHYTOPLANKTON
  • PHOTOSYNTHETIC PIGMENTS
  • FOOD AVAILABILITY
  • GROWTH-PHASE
  • HIGH PH
  • LIGHT
  • IRRADIANCE
  • PREY

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