Phosphate limitation in biological rapid sand filters used to remove ammonium from drinking water

Carson Odell Lee, Hans-Jørgen Albrechtsen, Barth F. Smets, Rasmus Boe-Hansen, Søren Lind, Philip John Binning

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Abstract

Removing ammonium from drinking water is important for maintaining biological stability in distribution systems. This is especially important in regions that do not use disinfectants in the treatment process or keep a disinfectant residual in the distribution system. Problems with nitrification can occur with increased ammonium loads caused by seasonal or operational changes and can lead to extensive periods of elevated ammonium and nitrite concentrations in the effluent. One possible cause of nitrification problems in these filters maybe due to phosphate limitation. This was investigated using a pilot scale sand column which initial analysis confirmed performed similarly to the full scale filters. Long term increased ammonium loads were applied to the pilot filter both with and without phosphate addition. Phosphate was added at a concentration of 0.5 mg PO4-P/L to ensure that it was not the limiting substrate. Preliminary results showed an increased nitrification capacity both with and without phosphate addition although the addition of phosphate doubled the ammonium and nitrite removal capacity of the filter compared to non-phosphate dosing conditions. Phosphate addition also increased the total number of ammonium oxidizing bacteria in the column. © 2013 American Water Works Association AWWA WQTC Conference Proceedings All Rights Reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAWWA WQTC Conference Proceedings
Number of pages5
Place of PublicationLong Beach, California
PublisherAmerican Water Works Association (AWWA)
Publication date2013
Publication statusPublished - 2013
Event2013 Water Quality Technology Coference - Long Beach Convention & Entertainment Center, Long Beach, United States
Duration: 4 Nov 20135 Nov 2013
http://www.awwa.org

Conference

Conference2013 Water Quality Technology Coference
LocationLong Beach Convention & Entertainment Center
CountryUnited States
CityLong Beach
Period04/11/201305/11/2013
Internet address

Keywords

  • Local area networks
  • Nitrification
  • Water quality
  • Disinfectants

Cite this

Lee, C. O., Albrechtsen, H-J., Smets, B. F., Boe-Hansen, R., Lind, S., & Binning, P. J. (2013). Phosphate limitation in biological rapid sand filters used to remove ammonium from drinking water. In AWWA WQTC Conference Proceedings Long Beach, California: American Water Works Association (AWWA).
Lee, Carson Odell ; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen ; Smets, Barth F. ; Boe-Hansen, Rasmus ; Lind, Søren ; Binning, Philip John. / Phosphate limitation in biological rapid sand filters used to remove ammonium from drinking water. AWWA WQTC Conference Proceedings. Long Beach, California : American Water Works Association (AWWA), 2013.
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title = "Phosphate limitation in biological rapid sand filters used to remove ammonium from drinking water",
abstract = "Removing ammonium from drinking water is important for maintaining biological stability in distribution systems. This is especially important in regions that do not use disinfectants in the treatment process or keep a disinfectant residual in the distribution system. Problems with nitrification can occur with increased ammonium loads caused by seasonal or operational changes and can lead to extensive periods of elevated ammonium and nitrite concentrations in the effluent. One possible cause of nitrification problems in these filters maybe due to phosphate limitation. This was investigated using a pilot scale sand column which initial analysis confirmed performed similarly to the full scale filters. Long term increased ammonium loads were applied to the pilot filter both with and without phosphate addition. Phosphate was added at a concentration of 0.5 mg PO4-P/L to ensure that it was not the limiting substrate. Preliminary results showed an increased nitrification capacity both with and without phosphate addition although the addition of phosphate doubled the ammonium and nitrite removal capacity of the filter compared to non-phosphate dosing conditions. Phosphate addition also increased the total number of ammonium oxidizing bacteria in the column. {\circledC} 2013 American Water Works Association AWWA WQTC Conference Proceedings All Rights Reserved.",
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Lee, CO, Albrechtsen, H-J, Smets, BF, Boe-Hansen, R, Lind, S & Binning, PJ 2013, Phosphate limitation in biological rapid sand filters used to remove ammonium from drinking water. in AWWA WQTC Conference Proceedings. American Water Works Association (AWWA), Long Beach, California, 2013 Water Quality Technology Coference, Long Beach, United States, 04/11/2013.

Phosphate limitation in biological rapid sand filters used to remove ammonium from drinking water. / Lee, Carson Odell; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Smets, Barth F.; Boe-Hansen, Rasmus; Lind, Søren; Binning, Philip John.

AWWA WQTC Conference Proceedings. Long Beach, California : American Water Works Association (AWWA), 2013.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingArticle in proceedingsResearchpeer-review

TY - GEN

T1 - Phosphate limitation in biological rapid sand filters used to remove ammonium from drinking water

AU - Lee, Carson Odell

AU - Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

AU - Smets, Barth F.

AU - Boe-Hansen, Rasmus

AU - Lind, Søren

AU - Binning, Philip John

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Removing ammonium from drinking water is important for maintaining biological stability in distribution systems. This is especially important in regions that do not use disinfectants in the treatment process or keep a disinfectant residual in the distribution system. Problems with nitrification can occur with increased ammonium loads caused by seasonal or operational changes and can lead to extensive periods of elevated ammonium and nitrite concentrations in the effluent. One possible cause of nitrification problems in these filters maybe due to phosphate limitation. This was investigated using a pilot scale sand column which initial analysis confirmed performed similarly to the full scale filters. Long term increased ammonium loads were applied to the pilot filter both with and without phosphate addition. Phosphate was added at a concentration of 0.5 mg PO4-P/L to ensure that it was not the limiting substrate. Preliminary results showed an increased nitrification capacity both with and without phosphate addition although the addition of phosphate doubled the ammonium and nitrite removal capacity of the filter compared to non-phosphate dosing conditions. Phosphate addition also increased the total number of ammonium oxidizing bacteria in the column. © 2013 American Water Works Association AWWA WQTC Conference Proceedings All Rights Reserved.

AB - Removing ammonium from drinking water is important for maintaining biological stability in distribution systems. This is especially important in regions that do not use disinfectants in the treatment process or keep a disinfectant residual in the distribution system. Problems with nitrification can occur with increased ammonium loads caused by seasonal or operational changes and can lead to extensive periods of elevated ammonium and nitrite concentrations in the effluent. One possible cause of nitrification problems in these filters maybe due to phosphate limitation. This was investigated using a pilot scale sand column which initial analysis confirmed performed similarly to the full scale filters. Long term increased ammonium loads were applied to the pilot filter both with and without phosphate addition. Phosphate was added at a concentration of 0.5 mg PO4-P/L to ensure that it was not the limiting substrate. Preliminary results showed an increased nitrification capacity both with and without phosphate addition although the addition of phosphate doubled the ammonium and nitrite removal capacity of the filter compared to non-phosphate dosing conditions. Phosphate addition also increased the total number of ammonium oxidizing bacteria in the column. © 2013 American Water Works Association AWWA WQTC Conference Proceedings All Rights Reserved.

KW - Local area networks

KW - Nitrification

KW - Water quality

KW - Disinfectants

M3 - Article in proceedings

BT - AWWA WQTC Conference Proceedings

PB - American Water Works Association (AWWA)

CY - Long Beach, California

ER -

Lee CO, Albrechtsen H-J, Smets BF, Boe-Hansen R, Lind S, Binning PJ. Phosphate limitation in biological rapid sand filters used to remove ammonium from drinking water. In AWWA WQTC Conference Proceedings. Long Beach, California: American Water Works Association (AWWA). 2013