Past explosive outbursts of entrapped carbon dioxide in salt mines provide a new perspective on the hazards of carbon dioxide

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Abstract

This paper reports on a source of past carbon dioxide accidents which so far has only been sporadically mentioned in the literature. Violent and highly destructive outbursts of hundreds of tons of CO2 occurred regularly, if not routinely, in the now closed salt mines of the former DDR. The Menzengraben mine experienced an extreme outburst in 1953, possibly involving a several thousand tons of carbon dioxide. This source of accidents fills an important gap in the available carbon dioxide accident history and may provide a unique empirical perspective on the hazards of handling very large amounts of CO2.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationIntelligent Systems and Decision Making for Risk Analysis and Crisis Response : Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Risk Analysis and Crisis Response, Istanbul, Turkey, 27-29 August 2013
EditorsC. Huang, C. Kahraman
PublisherCRC Press
Publication date2013
Pages763-769
ISBN (Print)9781138000193
Publication statusPublished - 2013
Event4th International Conference on Risk Analysis and Crisis Response: Intelligent Systems and Decision Making for Risk Analysis and Crisis Response - Istanbul Technical University - Macka Kampus (Faculty of Management), Istanbul, Turkey
Duration: 27 Aug 201329 Aug 2013
Conference number: 4
http://www.racr2013.itu.edu.tr/

Conference

Conference4th International Conference on Risk Analysis and Crisis Response
Number4
LocationIstanbul Technical University - Macka Kampus (Faculty of Management)
CountryTurkey
CityIstanbul
Period27/08/201329/08/2013
Internet address
SeriesCommunications in Cybernetics, Systems Science and Engineering – Proceedings
ISSN2325-3436

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