Passenger evaluation of the optimum balance between fresh air supply and humidity from 7-h exposures in a simulated aircraft cabin

Peter Strøm-Tejsen, David Peter Wyon, Love Per Lagercrantz, Lei Fang

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    A 21-seat section of an aircraft cabin with realistic pollution sources was built inside a climate chamber capable of providing fresh outside air at very low humidity. Maintaining a constant 200 l/s rate of total air supply, i.e. recircu-lated and make-up air, to the cabin, experiments simulating 7-h transatlantic flights were carried out at four rates of fresh outside air supply – 1.4, 3.3, 4.7, and 9.4 l/s per person (3, 7, 10, and 20 cfm/person) – resulting in humid-ity levels, ranging from 7% to 28% relative humidity (RH). Four groups of 16–18 subjects acted as passengers and crew and were each exposed to the four simulated flight conditions. During each flight the subjects completed questionnaires three times to provide subjective ratings of air quality and of symptoms commonly experienced during flight. Physiological tests of eye, nose, and skin function were administered twice. Analysis of the subjec-tive assessments showed that increasing RH in the aircraft cabin to 28% RH by reducing outside flow to 1.4 l/s per person did not reduce the intensity of the symptoms that are typical of the aircraft cabin environment. On the contrary, it intensified complaints of headache, dizziness, and claustrophobia, due to the increased level of con-taminants.
    Original languageEnglish
    JournalIndoor Air
    Volume17
    Issue number2
    Pages (from-to)92-108
    ISSN0905-6947
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2007

    Keywords

    • Sick building syndrome symptoms
    • Low humidity
    • Ventilation requirements
    • Passenger comfort
    • Cabin air quality
    • Aircraft cabin environment

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