Oxidation mechanism of nickel particles studied in an environmental transmission electron microscope

Q. Jeangros, Thomas Willum Hansen, Jakob Birkedal Wagner, Rafal E. Dunin-Borkowski, C. Hébert, J. Van Herle, A. Hessler-Wyser

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    The oxidation of nickel particles was studied in situ in an environmental transmission electron microscope in 3.2 mbar of O2 between ambient temperature and 600°C. Several different transmission electron microscopy imaging techniques, electron diffraction and electron energy-loss spectroscopy were used to study the evolution of the microstructure and the local chemical composition of the particles during oxidation. Our results suggest that built-in field effects control the initial stages of oxidation, with randomly oriented NiO crystallites and internal voids then forming as a result of outward diffusion of Ni2+ along NiO grain boundaries, self-diffusion of Ni2+ ions and vacancies, growth of NiO grains and nucleation of voids at Ni/NiO interfaces. We also observed the formation of transverse cracks in a growing NiO film in situ in the electron microscope.
    Original languageEnglish
    JournalActa Materialia
    Volume67
    Pages (from-to)362-372
    ISSN1359-6454
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2014

    Keywords

    • In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM)
    • Electron energy-loss spectroscopy
    • Oxidation
    • Kinetics
    • Diffusion

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