Optimum temperatures for growth and feed conversion in cultured hapuku (Polyprion oxygeneios) - Is there a link to aerobic metabolic scope and final temperature preference?

Javed Rafiq Khan, S. Pether, M. Bruce, S. P. Walker, N. A. Herbert

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

As temperature-based growth trials are lengthy, expensive and laborious to run, juvenile hapuku (Polyprion oxygeneios) were employed to assess whether respirometric tests and behavioural preference methods could be used to resolve the optimum temperature for growth and feed conversion efficiency in novel culture species. On the basis that the energetic costs of rapid growth are substantial and need to be accommodated physiologically, it was hypothesised that maximal growth and optimal feed conversion (feed conversion ratio, FCR) would be maximised at temperatures where aerobic metabolic scope (AMS) was also maximised. It was further hypothesised that hapuku would behaviourally self-select temperatures that lead to the greatest level of AMS, growth and FCR performance. Acclimating hapuku juveniles to 12, 15, 18, 21 and 24 degrees C for 4 weeks resulted in a peak in specific growth rate (SGR) at 18 and 21 degrees C with slower growth at lower and higher temperatures. AMS was also maximal between 18 and 21 degrees C and was therefore tightly linked with SGR. The behavioural thermal preference (T-pref) range of hapuku also fell within the optimum range for growth. FCR, however, was inversely related to temperature with the most and least efficient rates of conversion occurring at 12 degrees C and 24 degrees C respectively. Though AMS and Tpref had no utility in predicting the optimal range for FCR, standard metabolic rate (SMR) showed a positive linear relationship to FCR. The conclusions of the study are threefold: 1) Hapuku select temperatures that optimise both AMS and growth. 2) AMS and T-pref appear tightly linked with SGR and could possibly be used to predict the optimum temperature for growth in novel species. 3) AMS and Tpref have no utility in predicting the optimum temperature for FCR. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
JournalAquaculture
Volume430
Pages (from-to)107-113
ISSN0044-8486
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • FISHERIES
  • MARINE
  • JUVENILE ATLANTIC SALMON
  • NEW-ZEALAND HAPUKU
  • COD GADUS-MORHUA
  • BEHAVIORAL THERMOREGULATION
  • DYNAMIC ACTION
  • LEPOMIS-MACROCHIRUS
  • CLIMATE-CHANGE
  • BODY-SIZE
  • FISH
  • HYPOXIA
  • Polyprion oxygeneios
  • Metabolic rate
  • Respirometry
  • Behavioural thermoregulation
  • Feed conversion ratio
  • Aquatic Science
  • acclimation
  • bioenergetics
  • fish culture
  • growth rate
  • juvenile
  • metabolism
  • perciform
  • preference behavior
  • respiration
  • temperature effect
  • thermoregulation
  • Ecology: environmental biology - Wildlife management: aquatic
  • Animals, Chordates, Fish, Nonhuman Vertebrates, Vertebrates
  • specific growth rate
  • optimum temperature
  • growth factor
  • aerobic metabolic scope
  • optimal feed conversion

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