Optical tissue clearing improves usability of optical coherence tomography (OCT) for high-throughput analysis of the internal structure and 3D morphology of small biological objects such as vertebrate embryos

Lars Thrane, Thomas Martini Jørgensen, Jörg Männer

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingArticle in proceedingsResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Developmental biology studies frequently require rapid analysis of the morphology of a large number of embryos (highthroughput analysis). Conventional microscopic analysis is time-consuming and, therefore, is not well suited for highthroughput analysis. OCT facilitates rapid generation of optical sections through small biological objects at high resolutions. However, due to light scattering within biological tissues, the quality of OCT images drops significantly with increasing penetration depth of the light beam. We show that optical clearing of fixed embryonic organs with methyl benzoate can significantly reduce the light scattering and, thereby, improves the usability of OCT for high-throughput analysis of embryonic morphology.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationProceedings of Spie
    Number of pages7
    Volume8953
    PublisherSPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering
    Publication date2014
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2014
    EventSPIE Photonics West : Optical Methods in Developmental Biology II - San Francisco, California, United States
    Duration: 1 Feb 20146 Feb 2014

    Conference

    ConferenceSPIE Photonics West : Optical Methods in Developmental Biology II
    LocationSan Francisco, California
    Country/TerritoryUnited States
    Period01/02/201406/02/2014

    Keywords

    • Optical coherence tomography
    • Optical clearing
    • Methyl benzoate
    • High-throughput analysis
    • Vertebrate embryos
    • Embryonic chick hearts

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