On the use of liposome controls in studies investigating the clinical potential of extracellular vesicle-based drug delivery systems - A commentary

Kasper Bendix Johnsen, Johann Mar Gudbergsson, Meg Duroux, Torben Moos, Thomas Lars Andresen, Jens Bæk Simonsen*

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    The field of extracellular vesicle (EV)-based drug delivery systems has evolved significantly through the recent years, and numerous studies suggest that these endogenous nanoparticles can function as efficient drug delivery vehicles in a variety of diseases. Many characteristics of these EV-based drug delivery vehicles suggest them to be superior at residing in the systemic circulation and possibly at mediating therapeutic effects compared to synthetic drug delivery vehicles, e.g. liposomes. In this Commentary, we discuss how some currently published head-to-head comparisons of EVs versus liposomes are weakened by the inadequate choice of liposomal formulation, and encourage researchers to implement better controls to show any potential superiority of EVs over other synthetic nanoparticles.
    Original languageEnglish
    JournalJournal of Controlled Release
    Volume269
    Pages (from-to)10-14
    ISSN0168-3659
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2018

    Keywords

    • Controls
    • Drug delivery
    • Exosomes
    • Extracellular vesicles
    • Liposomes
    • Targeting

    Cite this

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    title = "On the use of liposome controls in studies investigating the clinical potential of extracellular vesicle-based drug delivery systems - A commentary",
    abstract = "The field of extracellular vesicle (EV)-based drug delivery systems has evolved significantly through the recent years, and numerous studies suggest that these endogenous nanoparticles can function as efficient drug delivery vehicles in a variety of diseases. Many characteristics of these EV-based drug delivery vehicles suggest them to be superior at residing in the systemic circulation and possibly at mediating therapeutic effects compared to synthetic drug delivery vehicles, e.g. liposomes. In this Commentary, we discuss how some currently published head-to-head comparisons of EVs versus liposomes are weakened by the inadequate choice of liposomal formulation, and encourage researchers to implement better controls to show any potential superiority of EVs over other synthetic nanoparticles.",
    keywords = "Controls, Drug delivery, Exosomes, Extracellular vesicles, Liposomes, Targeting",
    author = "Johnsen, {Kasper Bendix} and Gudbergsson, {Johann Mar} and Meg Duroux and Torben Moos and Andresen, {Thomas Lars} and Simonsen, {Jens B{\ae}k}",
    year = "2018",
    doi = "10.1016/j.jconrel.2017.11.002",
    language = "English",
    volume = "269",
    pages = "10--14",
    journal = "Journal of Controlled Release",
    issn = "0168-3659",
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    On the use of liposome controls in studies investigating the clinical potential of extracellular vesicle-based drug delivery systems - A commentary. / Johnsen, Kasper Bendix; Gudbergsson, Johann Mar; Duroux, Meg; Moos, Torben; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Simonsen, Jens Bæk.

    In: Journal of Controlled Release, Vol. 269, 2018, p. 10-14.

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - On the use of liposome controls in studies investigating the clinical potential of extracellular vesicle-based drug delivery systems - A commentary

    AU - Johnsen, Kasper Bendix

    AU - Gudbergsson, Johann Mar

    AU - Duroux, Meg

    AU - Moos, Torben

    AU - Andresen, Thomas Lars

    AU - Simonsen, Jens Bæk

    PY - 2018

    Y1 - 2018

    N2 - The field of extracellular vesicle (EV)-based drug delivery systems has evolved significantly through the recent years, and numerous studies suggest that these endogenous nanoparticles can function as efficient drug delivery vehicles in a variety of diseases. Many characteristics of these EV-based drug delivery vehicles suggest them to be superior at residing in the systemic circulation and possibly at mediating therapeutic effects compared to synthetic drug delivery vehicles, e.g. liposomes. In this Commentary, we discuss how some currently published head-to-head comparisons of EVs versus liposomes are weakened by the inadequate choice of liposomal formulation, and encourage researchers to implement better controls to show any potential superiority of EVs over other synthetic nanoparticles.

    AB - The field of extracellular vesicle (EV)-based drug delivery systems has evolved significantly through the recent years, and numerous studies suggest that these endogenous nanoparticles can function as efficient drug delivery vehicles in a variety of diseases. Many characteristics of these EV-based drug delivery vehicles suggest them to be superior at residing in the systemic circulation and possibly at mediating therapeutic effects compared to synthetic drug delivery vehicles, e.g. liposomes. In this Commentary, we discuss how some currently published head-to-head comparisons of EVs versus liposomes are weakened by the inadequate choice of liposomal formulation, and encourage researchers to implement better controls to show any potential superiority of EVs over other synthetic nanoparticles.

    KW - Controls

    KW - Drug delivery

    KW - Exosomes

    KW - Extracellular vesicles

    KW - Liposomes

    KW - Targeting

    U2 - 10.1016/j.jconrel.2017.11.002

    DO - 10.1016/j.jconrel.2017.11.002

    M3 - Journal article

    VL - 269

    SP - 10

    EP - 14

    JO - Journal of Controlled Release

    JF - Journal of Controlled Release

    SN - 0168-3659

    ER -