On-site measurements of ventilation performance and indoor air quality in naturally ventilated high-rise residential buildings in Hong Kong

Zhengtao Ai, C. M. Mak, D. J. Cui

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Single-sided ventilation rate is difficult to accurately predict because it has a complex relationship with many factors, including the direction of the approaching wind and building envelope features. In addition, the incursion of outdoor pollutants into the interior through a ventilation opening has been recognized as a serious threat to indoor air quality (IAQ). This article presents on-site measurements of the ventilation performance and IAQ in four high-rise residential rooms in Hong Kong. Key parameters including the air changes per hour, respirable suspended particulate matters (PM: PM10 and PM2.5), and total volatile organic compounds were continuously recorded over a specified period. A comparison of cases with floor-extended and window-like openings is made. The results indicate that single-sided ventilation performs well regardless of the orientation of the apartment room and the configuration of the opening. Previous empirical models based on single-room buildings are not reliable in determining the ventilation rate of high-rise buildings. The measurements reported here also identify an important route for the incursion of outdoor pollutants, namely the downward re-entry of aerosol particles from an upper unit to a lower unit in the same building. A combination of gravitational and wind effects means this downward transport route significantly increases the PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations in the lower room.
Original languageEnglish
JournalIndoor and Built Environment
Volume24
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)214-224
Number of pages11
ISSN1420-326X
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • ACH
  • High-rise buildings
  • On-site measurement
  • PM10
  • PM2.5

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'On-site measurements of ventilation performance and indoor air quality in naturally ventilated high-rise residential buildings in Hong Kong'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this