OCT-derived attenuation coefficient can differentiate between healthy and diabetic bone in a mouse model

Gavrielle R. Untracht*, Lasse Bo Mortensen, Lejla Emini, Niklas Rye Jørgensen, Peter E. Andersen

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) is increasing in prevalence and its complications are potentially fatal. Recent studies suggest that long-term complications of T2DM include alterations of the bone, evident by a high coexistence rate of diabetes mellitus with both osteoporosis and different fracture types. Current measurements of fracture risk are based on Bone Mineral Density (BMD) measured via Dual-energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA); however, this method does not measure bone quality and often underestimates fracture risk in T2DM. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) holds the promise of early detection of diabetic bone microarchitectural alteration and serves as a possible non-ionizing alternative to DXA. The aim of this study is to evaluate the viability of using OCT-derived attenuation coefficients as a method for differentiating between healthy and diabetic bones in a diagnostic process. A TALLYHO/JngJ mouse model of diabetes was used and compared to a healthy control SWR/J; the differences in bone structure and quality of the TALLYHO/JngJ model compared with SWR/J is well documented in the literature. OCT cross-sectional images of four ex-vivo mouse femurs, two healthy and two T2DM, were used to calculate attenuation coefficients. Coefficients were calculated for the anterior side and the posterior side of the femurs. The posterior side was used as a control for the anterior side of the same femur sample. The attenuation-based comparison between healthy and diabetic bones shows that it is possible to differentiate between healthy and diabetic bones (p = 0.002). No significant difference in attenuation between the anterior and posterior side (p = 0.543, T2DM and p =0.055, healthy) was found. These preliminary results indicate that OCT-derived attenuation coefficients have the potential to differentiate between healthy and diabetic bones in a mouse model of T2DM.
Original languageEnglish
Article number126320H
JournalProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume12632
Number of pages4
ISSN0277-786X
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2023
Event2023 Optical Coherence Imaging Techniques and Imaging in Scattering Media - Munich, Germany
Duration: 25 Jun 202329 Jun 2023

Conference

Conference2023 Optical Coherence Imaging Techniques and Imaging in Scattering Media
Country/TerritoryGermany
CityMunich
Period25/06/202329/06/2023

Keywords

  • Optical coherence tomography
  • Optical attenuation, diabetes
  • Osteoporosis
  • Diabetic bone disease

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