No long-term effect of oral stimulation on the intra-oral vacuum in healthy premature infants

Diana Skaaning*, Hanne Kronborg, Anne Brødsgaard, Rasmus Solmer, Ole Pryds, Emma Malchau Carlsen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Aim: Exclusive breastfeeding is recommended for the first 6 months of life, but the breastfeeding rate in premature infants is low. We examined the effect of oral stimulation on infant's strength of suction and the relation between this intra-oral vacuum and breastfeeding duration. Method: Between 2016 and 2018, 211 infants in a Danish neonatal unit were randomised 1:1 and of these 108 to oral stimulation intervention and 103 to control. Suction was measured as peak vacuum at enrolment and a corrected age of 6 weeks. Breastfeeding duration was registered. Results: Vacuum increased from enrolment to a corrected age of 6 weeks in all infants, and no effect of oral stimulation intervention was demonstrated P =.08. Infants born ≤32 gestational weeks had lower vacuum compared with infants born after, 350 vs 398 mbar P 
Original languageEnglish
JournalActa Paediatrica
Volume109
Issue number10
Pages (from-to)2025-2032
ISSN0803-5253
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020

Keywords

  • Exclusive breastfeeding
  • Intra-oral vacuum
  • Oral stimulation
  • Premature infants
  • Strength of suction

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